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9 results for Lumbee Indians--North Carolina
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Record #:
2515
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although the Lumbee Indians are the state's largest Indian tribe, the federal government does not recognize them as such and grants them little funding. A bill to grant recognition was stalled in the U.S. Congress in 1994.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 15 Issue 10, Oct 1995, p40-44, 46, 48-49, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
11995
Abstract:
Noah Woods, principal of Oxendine Elementary School in Maxton, is a person dedicated to his children, his profession, his community, and his Lumbee Indian heritage.
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Record #:
16303
Author(s):
Abstract:
When questions arise concerning the history or traditions of the Lumbee Indians of North Carolina, the first person approached is Adolph Dial, a Lumbee historian and humanitarian. Dial, the chairman of the American Indian studies Department at Pembroke State University, has long been recognized, locally and nationally, for his knowledge and contributions to the preservation and perpetuation of the oral and written history and folk traditions of the Lumbee people. His accomplishments include the creation of the Lumbee Regional Development Association (LRDA), the outdoor drama Strike at the Wind, the tribal history THE ONLY LAND I KNOW, and the organization of the Department of American Indian Studies at Pembroke State University.
Record #:
22328
Author(s):
Abstract:
Upon first contact Europeans encountered several Native American tribes occupying what is now North Carolina. Of significance among them was the Croatan tribe. In the nineteenth this name was extended to other Native American groups.
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Record #:
27772
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history of Willie French Lowery, his band, and his impact on the Lumbee Indian community in North Carolina is explored. Lowery’s rock band, Plant and See, became successful in the 1960s and Paradise of Bachelors record label is reissuing their record. Lowery was a Lumbee Indian from Robeson County who struggled with his fame and people’s desire to label him. Later in life, Lowery became a community activist and wrote folk songs about his community.
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Record #:
31095
Abstract:
This article provides excerpts from the book, “River Spirits: A Collection of Lumbee Writings,” edited by Stanley Knick and published by the University of North Carolina at Pembroke’s Native American Resource Center. The book provides a window into the Lumbee culture, and features a variety of work about the tribe’s past and hopeful future.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 8, Aug 2004, p16-19, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35469
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several superstitions and stories concerning the supernatural that was told to the author as a boy by his father.
Record #:
36375
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author presented her writings on the Lumbee Indians and her work schedule. She was awarded Individual Literary First Place during the Twenty-fifth Anniversary Awards Day program of the Tar Hill Junior Historian Association.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 18 Issue No. 1, , p28-29, il
Record #:
39444
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fazio and Hutchens are both professors at the University of North Carolina Pembroke; they made a documentary film, Voices of the Lumbee, which captured the culture, religious and economic life, and work history of the Lumbee tribe in North Carolina.