NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


3 results for Logging railroads--History
Currently viewing results 1 - 3
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
10694
Abstract:
The lumber business that began and spread across the state in the 1880s could not have done so without the logging railroad. So many logging firms relied on railroads to transport logs from the woods to the mills that North Carolina had one of the heaviest concentrations of such railroads in the country. While most were temporary, some grew from private carriers into modern common carriers that are still active today, such as the Durham & Southern and the Aberdeen & Rockfish. The last logging railroad in North Carolina was the line of the Bemis Hardwood Lumber Co., near Robbinsville, that ceased logging operations in 1947.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 9, Oct 1969, p8-10, il
Full Text:
Record #:
23129
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pinetown's story revolves around one man--Surry Parker. He worked for the Roanoke Railroad and Lumber Company in Virginia, and the company sent him to build a railroad between Plymouth, North Carolina and the Dismal Swamp. He then developed Pinetown by building homes and businesses, as well as bringing technology to the small town.
Source:
Record #:
1344
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beginning in the 1880s, logging railroads made large-scale logging operations possible. By around 1910, North Carolina was an important producer of lumber for the national market.
Full Text: