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5 results for Log cabins
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Record #:
13368
Author(s):
Abstract:
Davis recounts life in a mountain log home seventy years ago in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 12, Aug 1953, p12-13, f
Subject(s):
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Record #:
13565
Author(s):
Abstract:
The biggest log house ever built in the Smoky Mountains was 2 stories high, 90 feet long, and contained the first real bathrooms ever installed in the county. Constructed on Hooper's Bald, the house was completed in 1910 and contained an eight foot tall wire fence surrounding the property.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 17, Sept 1952, p3-5, 19, il
Subject(s):
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Record #:
23613
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tim and Leslie Donovan discuss the history of their 19th century log home in the mountains of Asheville.
Record #:
29796
Author(s):
Abstract:
Homeland Park is a neighborhood of historic log cabins and an eclectic mix of residents in Asheville, North Carolina. Originally developed as a mountain resort in the 1930s, Homeland Park was renovated and transformed into a vibrant community.
Full Text:
Record #:
35798
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wise proposed that logs belonged not in a fireplace, but on a homestead. To boost his argument that it was a viable residential alternative, he noted the speed in which a log cabin could be constructed (with modern tools such as a chain saw, it could be built in a month, that is). Added were its virtues as an efficient source of insulation and architectural source of rustic charm.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p