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5 results for Greenhow, Rose O'Neal, 1814-1864
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Record #:
4106
Author(s):
Abstract:
Through her prominent position in Washington, DC society, Mrs. Rose O'Neal Greenhow was able to gather information of value to the South during the Civil War. Imprisoned by the North, then later deported to Richmond, she went to Europe in 1862 to try to win support for the Southern cause. On her return in 1864, her ship ran aground off Wilmington, and she drowned attempting to reach shore.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 11, Apr 1999, p17-18, 20-21, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
6586
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mrs. Rose O'Neal Greenhow used her high-society connections in Washington, D.C., to gather information of value to the South during the Civil War. Imprisoned by the North, then later deported to Richmond, she went to Europe in 1862 to try to win support for the Southern cause. On her return in 1864, her ship, trying to evade a ship mistaken for a Union gunboat, ran aground off Wilmington. Greenhow drowned attempting to reach shore.
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Record #:
10612
Author(s):
Abstract:
The most successful Confederate spy, in terms of turning in the most important and vital military information, was probably Washington socialite Mrs. Rose O'Neal Greenhow. Wealthy, educated, and widowed, Mrs. Greenhow used her luxurious home as the center of Confederate espionage activities, apparently making little or no effort to hide her support of the South. Arousing the suspicion of Federal authorities, Mrs. Greenhow was shadowed by Allen Pinkerton and arrested by Union forces for espionage. Despite being sentenced to house arrest, Mrs. Greenhow continued her work for the Confederate cause, including a secret mission to Europe in 1862. Greenhow drowned on the return voyage in 1864 when her ship ran aground near Fort Fisher.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Aug 1970, p11, 28, il, por
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Record #:
14726
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rose O'Neal Greenhow was a famous Confederate spy who gave advance notice of the movement of Federal troops toward Bull Run, and rendered many other services to the Southern cause.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 21, Oct 1944, p7, 23
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Record #:
38151
Author(s):
Abstract:
Childhood contact with government officials, along with marriage to a man with a post in the US State Department, made Rose O’Neal Greenhow apt for her role in the Civil War. As a slave owner and staunch anti-abolitionist, she was a natural fit as a Confederate spy. Even during her 1861 house arrest, she shared the Union Army’s secrets with top military brass in Richmond. Ranking within the Confederate government and a government post abroad, along with her memoir’s publication, assured that her death by sea would not sink Greenhow to obscurity.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 2, July 2013, p56-58, 60-62 Periodical Website