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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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17 results for Cancer--Research
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Record #:
1679
Author(s):
Abstract:
Alicia White, a doctoral student in the curriculum of Genetics and Molecular Biology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is researching the genetic defects that may commence a cell's progression to cancer.
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Record #:
1894
Abstract:
The N.C. Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources implemented in 1982 a program to evaluate cancer clusters, an increased cancer rate in a small area or within a short time period. An overview of current evaluating procedures is included
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 56, Apr 1991, p1-16, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
2910
Abstract:
Funded in 1992 by the National Cancer Institute, SPORE (Specialized Program of Research Excellence) is a cooperative, multidisciplinary program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill that investigates breast cancer.
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Record #:
24877
Abstract:
Carol Dickinson and Tim Aldrich use information provided by North Carolina Hospitals and the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry to determine the accuracy of both cancer incidence and tumor registries.
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CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. 67 Issue , June 1992, p1-13, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
25693
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eastern North Carolina has a higher rate of deaths from breast cancer than the national average due to folklore, fear, and misunderstanding of the disease. But a long-term project at East Carolina University is seeking to change this through an interdisciplinary study of the issues that lead women to delay screening and treatment.
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Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 1998, p16-20, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25709
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center, jointly supported by ECU’s Brody School of Medicine and Pitt County Memorial Hospital, has become the site for testing a new field of photodynamic therapy.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2002, p3 Periodical Website
Record #:
25718
Author(s):
Abstract:
UNC encourages physicians to consider conducting trials at their clinics. Clinical trials are necessary to advance research and treatment, but recruiting patients is difficult if they think a drug is being tested on them. For liver-cancer patient Don Yarborough, participating in a trial was crucial. If the treatment does not help him, he said, maybe the research would help someone else.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall 2008, p4-10, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25835
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drs. Gordon Downie and Rosa Cuenca are working with Dr. Ron Allison, a radiation oncologist and chairman of the Department of Radiation Oncology at East Carolina’s Brody School of Medicine on a unique and innovate cancer treatment: photodynamic therapy, which uses light rays to target cancerous cells. The Photodynamic Therapy Center is housed at the Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center, supported by Brody and Pitt County Memorial Hospital.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p12-15 Periodical Website
Record #:
29510
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cancer survival rates have not been tracked by the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry, largely due to the insufficient resources necessary to actively follow up with patients after diagnosis. This study compared survival rates for North Carolina patients followed via passive methods to survival rates reported by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, which actively follows patients after diagnosis.
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SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 163, June 2010, p1-7, il, bibl, f
Record #:
29213
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sophisticated telecommunication systems are known to be good for business, but now they are being used to help doctors treat cancer faster and more accurately across North Carolina. VISTAnet is an experimental, high speed telecommunication systems that links universities, industries, and state consortiums in the battle against cancer.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 5, May 1991, p18, il
Record #:
29465
Abstract:
This study examined current differences in North Carolina between African-American and white women in cervical cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis, treatment, and mortality. Results suggest the need for increased preventative cervical cancer screening for African-American women, so that cancer cases can be detected at an earlier stage.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 134, Aug 2002, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
29654
Author(s):
Abstract:
The University of North Carolina School of Medicine and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have been afforded $65 million of state funds over the next two years. Through the University Cancer Research Fund, UNC will provide the top cancer research and treatment operations in the country.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p36-38, por
Record #:
29655
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2006, cancer was North Carolina's leading cause of death, but the state is not sitting idly by. Cancer centers in the state are leading comprehensive research and conducting clinical trials at universities and cancer centers from the coast to the mountains.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p41-43, por
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Record #:
31336
Author(s):
Abstract:
A family establishes a film festival at their home in remembrance of son they lost to cancer. Their efforts later evolved into a non-profit organization that raises money for cancer research.
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