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16 results for High technology industries
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Record #:
2141
Author(s):
Abstract:
While major funding for the North Carolina Information Highway is moving slowly in the legislature, high-tech industries, such as telecommunications and electronics, continue to expand. Statistics reveal facts about companies and employment.
Record #:
3420
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tobacco, furniture, textiles, and tourism are among the industries driving the state's economy. Now high technology industries are becoming a major force, and the state is ranked nationally in the top five in creating high tech jobs.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 55 Issue 8, Aug 1997, p11-15, il
Record #:
4443
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although high-tech companies make up only 10 percent of the list of the state's one hundred largest employers, the technology itself affects the remaining companies in a number of ways, including improving security, efficiency, recordkeeping, and cost reduction. Waller lists the top one hundred employers. Delhaize America, Inc. is the largest employer with 35,355 workers.
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Record #:
24220
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2002, nearly 20,000 North Carolinians in high tech jobs were unemployed as jobs such as programming were moved overseas for cheaper labor.
Record #:
24244
Author(s):
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Vivek Wadhwa is CEO of Relativity Technologies Inc., a Cary software maker. This article discusses the way he runs his business and how he has excelled as an entrepreneur, while also presenting some of his shortcomings as CEO.
Record #:
24285
Abstract:
This article discusses how venture-capitalist investment in high-technology industries has slowly declined since 2000. Some of the difficulties companies face are an inability to close sales, running out of funds, and venture capitalists no longer investing.
Record #:
24281
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article discusses how few women there are in high-technology industries in North Carolina and highlights some of the gender-bias they must face in the industry.
Record #:
24306
Author(s):
Abstract:
Greensboro-based RF Micro Devices Inc. hopes to build North Carolina's only home-grown semiconductor plant, which would be used to make microchips and ultimately boost North Carolina's high-technology industry.
Record #:
24321
Author(s):
Abstract:
The number of high-tech manufacturers in North Carolina has steadily risen since 1977. Over this time, manufacturing has become the backbone for the state's economy.
Record #:
24365
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cone Mills Minneola plant in Gibsonville shut down in 1988, causing about 500 people to lose their jobs. While textile mills have closed all over North Carolina, a new industry is on the rise: computers and electronics.
Record #:
24387
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many high-tech entrepreneurs have gotten their businesses off the ground as a result of venture capital. Once in short supply, venture capital has increased drastically over the past few years. The availability of such seed money has made a difference to many North Carolina businesses.
Record #:
24390
Author(s):
Abstract:
The SAS Institute in Cary, North Carolina, is leading the way in how companies can use technology to make business more streamlined. The company features automated calling services, electronic mail service, and an uninterruptible power source that can keep equipment running even when the power goes off.
Record #:
29212
Author(s):
Abstract:
California and Massachusetts may boast high tech corridors, but North Carolina is rapidly becoming a hotbed of high-technology research and development. Fiber optic cables, digital networks, super computers, and software are all being manufactured in North Carolina, making the state's national and international contribution to industries such as telecommunications top of the list.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 5, May 1991, p16-17, 20, 22, 24, por
Record #:
29213
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sophisticated telecommunication systems are known to be good for business, but now they are being used to help doctors treat cancer faster and more accurately across North Carolina. VISTAnet is an experimental, high speed telecommunication systems that links universities, industries, and state consortiums in the battle against cancer.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 5, May 1991, p18, il