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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for "Traditional food"
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Record #:
34886
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North Carolina has been a good state for growing wheat in for centuries. But now, there is a renaissance occurring for heirloom grains. Small businesses including bakers, wheat farmers, and millers have begun to work together in order to bring back traditional grains into bread recipes of the south.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p122-130, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
39446
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In a tradition dating back to the time of slavery, Blue Monday Shad Fry is and event conducted the day after Easter, when hundreds of shad are caught and cooked in honor of springtime.
Record #:
36337
Author(s):
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Food is an integral part of the traditions in many people’s lives, including the author’s. At every holiday, celebration, event, a traditional or corresponding food was always prepared for the occasion.
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Record #:
30692
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Oyster roasts are an eastern North Carolina tradition during the winter. In this article, the author discusses traditions in Plymouth, North Carolina, the process of roasting oysters, and family oyster recipes.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 12, Dec 2014, p16, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27444
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The Ceja Bautista family is distributing bowls of pozole stew at a mobile home park in Durham to celebrate Saint Francis of Assisi. The stew is rooted in spiritual traditions and Mexican celebrations that express gratitude with generosity.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 40, Oct 2016, p14-16, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
31520
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Abstract:
Traditional Southern breakfasts featured grits, homemade biscuits, country ham or sausage, red eye gravy, and eggs. This tradition, which appears to be fading, is now reserved for special occasions or holidays. Dr. Thomas K. Fitzgerald, a nutritional anthropologist at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, discusses the history and evolution of Southern food culture.
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