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79 results for "Outer Banks--History"
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Record #:
8956
Abstract:
As early as 1694, livestock was being raised and sold on the Outer Banks. Although subject to the onslaught of storms, livestock was well fed and protected by the marshes. Because of overpopulation, free ranging stock has been almost completely eliminated in recent decades.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 4, Sept 1979, p10-13, il
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Record #:
9480
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In 1949, before he became a world-famous poet, A. R. Ammons held his first teaching job at Hatteras Elementary School in Hatteras Village on the Outer Banks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p204-206, 208, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9510
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The Chicamacomico Life-Saving Station Historic Site at Rodanthe on Hatteras Island is the most complete of the few remaining stations on the East Coast. These stations were the predecessors of the Coast Guard Service, and the stories of the daring rescues they performed are legendary. Chicamacomico closed in 1954 after seventy years of service. Today, the Chicamacomico Historical Association keeps the memory of the station and the men who served there alive through living history performances.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 11, Nov 2007, p50-51, il
Record #:
10287
Abstract:
Before the advent of the new hard-surfaced highway on the Outer Banks, bus travel to Hatteras could be a long, often thrilling experience. The Midgett family has operated the route for almost thirty years. The trip could take as much as six hours to complete. Travel was over the sand trails, with detours into the surf at times in order to find firmer sand and crossing Oregon Inlet was by ferry.
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Record #:
10809
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In February of 1750, a fleet of five Spanish ships heavily loaded with silver and spices sailed from Veracruz, the collection point of the Spanish Empire in the New World, to Havana. From there, the ships were to sail for Europe, but were instead wrecked by gale force winds along the coast of North Carolina. The EL SALVADOR, the NEUSTRA SIGNORA DE SOLEDAD, and three unnamed vessels were lost at various points on the Carolina coast, ranging from Topsail Island, to Ocracoke, Hatteras, and New Currituck Inlet.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 19, Mar 1969, p11-12, il
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Record #:
13277
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The Outer Banks have been called North Carolina's most pronounced geographical curiosity. Pleasants details the history and the changes that have occurred on the Outer Banks.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 7, July 1953, p21-23, f
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Record #:
13322
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Including Core Sound, Core Bank, Shackleford Bank, and Cape Lookout, this article discusses the water and history of this region of North Carolina's southern Outer Banks.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 15, Dec 1954, p10-11, 19, il, map
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Record #:
13467
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Containing photos from 1936 through the 1950s, this article discusses roadway improvements on the Outer Banks. Including information relative to sites along the way, Bill Sharpe revisits the various phases of transportation support extended to these offshore islands.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 6, July 1952, p3-5, 19, il
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Record #:
16255
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David Stick has written four major histories of the North Carolina coast. Through Stick's books and articles, the reader gains not only a factual chronicle of the history of the North Carolina coast, but also a lively appreciation of the details of regional traditional life--of the forms and functions of the folk-life of communities and occupational groups along the Outer Banks.
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Record #:
19416
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For the first seven months of World War II, German U-Boats ruled the Eastern seaboard of the United States. Waters off North Carolina's Outer Banks were a favorite hunting ground as night after night explosions at sea signaled the sinking of another Allied ship. By the time the Germans withdrew their U-Boats in July, over 400 ships were sunk or damaged from New England to New Orleans and 5,000 sailors were killed. Over sixty ships went down off the Outer Banks.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 11, Apr 2013, p50-52, 54, 56-58, 60, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
19531
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Captain Ernie Foster's father, Captain Ernal Foster, started the first charter boat business on North Carolina's Outer Banks in 1937. Locals laughed at him at first and wondered how such an undertaking could be successful; yet, over the years his business grew and prospered. Captain Ernie is probably the last captain in the original family. Sports fishing, however, is a big competitor of commercial fishing, and Captain Ernie works to keep his family fleet that fishes for fun.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p130-134, 136-138, 140, 142-144, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
20768
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This article provides a history of the Outer Banks during the period of the Revolutionary War with a particular focus on Ocracoke Island and Ocracoke Inlet. Progressing chronologically, the author details troop positions, defenses, and naval maneuvers made on the barrier islands during the war years.
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Record #:
23119
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Judge Charles Harry Whedbee, a Greenville native, was drawn to the Outer Banks throughout his life. Spending every summer at Nags Head, he heard stories, myths, and legends, all of which he later recorded through his own oral storytelling and writing.
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Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Spring 2015, p46-47, por
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Record #:
24442
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Charles Harry Whedbee (1875-1945) was Greenville’s chief district court judge who dedicated much of his time to preserving Outer Banks folklore. This article presents his life history and accomplishments, one of which was drinking from Blackbeard’s skull.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 10, March 1991, p18-19, por
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