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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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39 results for "Community colleges"
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Record #:
344
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The North Carolina Arts Council and the North Carolina Department of Community Colleges combined to create the Visiting Artist Program, which brings artists of all mediums and cultures to different community colleges in the state.
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NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Feb 1983, p60-61, il
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Record #:
36243
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Proving the persistent presence of the manufacturing industry in the state’s economic development are eight experts. Questions related to manufacturing covered these topics: its current state, how it has changed, how it recruits and develops workers, what can help sustain it, how can federal initiatives help it, and how it will change over the next two decades. Their responses collectively indicate the important role community colleges play in its development, changes in business ethics, and need for ongoing technological advancements.
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Record #:
29590
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The Small Business Center, associated with Pitt Community College, provides client-oriented resources through individual counseling times, classes, and seminars for new business owners or established businesses in the region.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 11, Nov-Sup 2007, p23, por
Record #:
29777
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Running a small business is difficult, but the North Carolina Small Business Center Networks provides every tool possible to make the task a little easier. Operating out of all the state's 58 community colleges, the network provides workshops and guidance to help the small business sector grow throughout North Carolina.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 1, Jan 2009, p24-25, por
Record #:
569
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rising tuition at North Carolina's community colleges may be closing doors to an increasing population of students who are trying to increase their marketable skills.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p28-30, il
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Record #:
29327
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Abstract:
In the wake of the 1991 North Carolina General Assembly session and the $1.25 billion revenue shortfall, the Department of Community Colleges is continuing to find more effective ways to deliver training and education. To aid community colleges with their goals in the face of growing enrollment, schools are seeking aid from the business community to provide backing in both funds and morale.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, September 1991, p28-30, il, por
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Record #:
32320
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Abstract:
The Charlotte Chamber of Commerce in cooperation with Central Piedmont Community College have generated a unique program for improving the supply of skilled labor in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg area. The community college is helping businesses by providing workers training in technical and trade areas, such as welding and metal work. Several Charlotte welding firms are already beginning intensive drives to recruit people for classes at the community college.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 4, Apr 1969, p33-34, il, por
Record #:
30919
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The NC Community College System prepares students for a variety of careers, while giving members of the workforce opportunities to enhance their skill sets.
Record #:
5901
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In 1963, the North Carolina General Assembly created a statewide community college system. Today the system has become a model for the nation and is rivaled only by those in California and Texas. Around 800,000 students are enrolled across the state.
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Record #:
18760
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Historically, the community college system developed to provide the state with a qualified work-force to fill manufacturing jobs beginning with Buncombe County Junior College in 1928. Having been organized into a state-wide system in 1963 under the Community College Act, this network of institutions faced contemporary problems of changing economic demands throughout the early 2000s. The author presents the history of the community college system to try and anticipate how this institution will need to adapt to future developments within the state's evolving economy.
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Record #:
31094
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It is often assumed that the cost of college education can be reduced by two-year community colleges such as the system proposed for North Carolina. Costs to the students are lower than other institutions; however, total operating costs can be substantial to the taxpayer and can only be offset by large enrollment numbers.
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Record #:
6855
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The North Carolina Community College System is the country's third largest. Around 800,000 students are served by 58 colleges with more than 100 campuses. Not only does the system provide citizens with basic skills for the workplace, it also makes available and provides higher education instruction. Gimpel highlights a number of the colleges and an offered specialty that is determined by the school's location: Brunswick Community College (aquaculture); Sandhills Community College (golf course management); and Surry Community College (grape cultivation and wine making).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 4, Sept 2004, p86-90, 92, 94-95, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30315
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Dr. Scott Ralls became the seventh president of the North Carolina Community College System in May. Ralls points out that some of the major issues facing the System are degree completion, faculty salaries, and workforce shortages in jobs. In this article, Ralls discusses how he will focus on five major areas to overcome these issues and challenges in the state’s community colleges.
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Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 87 Issue 3, Fall 2008, p11-12, il, por
Record #:
18740
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Abstract:
The state's community college system was developed in the 1960s by W. Dallas Herring, former Chairman of the State Board of Education. By 2008, changing economic dynamics prompted a reevaluation of the system and how to meet the state's educational, and ultimately employment, needs. The author assesses what he determined to be four critical areas of concern faced by community colleges (\"nontraditional\" students, completion rates, work force shortage, and lack of infrastructure for students) and how to overcome these issues to create a more productive system and better educated and qualified workforce for the state.
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Record #:
1876
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Former governor Bob Scott is ending his 11-year tenure as head of the community college system. Scott's advocacy has been an invaluable part of making the state's community college system a model for the nation.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 9, Sept 1994, p44-46, il