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5 results for Vocational training
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Record #:
3973
Author(s):
Abstract:
To better prepare its students for the 21st century, the Guilford County School System initiated in 1994 the Workforce Preparedness program. Occupational training is used for situations where training occurs after formal education. This is a collaborative effort of business and schools in preparing students for the job market. It has been recognized as a model program on both the state and national level.
Source:
Voice (NoCar LB 2831.624 N8 V6x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1998, p20, il
Record #:
31281
Author(s):
Abstract:
Given North Carolina's free enterprise system and enduring good business climate, business education is the most popular high school vocational training program in the state's public high schools. Business courses and programs are also offered in North Carolina colleges, and now in the largest private vocational education program in the state.
Source:
Record #:
32173
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Haywood Technical Institute, located outside of Clyde in Haywood County, has a new sawmill complex specifically designed to train workers for the sawmill industry. Students enrolled in the sawmill courses learn to be sawyers, saw filers, lumber grader-dry kiln operators and planers.
Source:
Record #:
32234
Author(s):
Abstract:
Congressman Graham A. Barden represented North Carolina’s Third District from 1935 to 1961, and headed the House Education and Labor Committee for a decade. Barden made many valuable contributions, including legislation making vocational training possible for all types of physically handicapped people, and efforts to control corruption in labor unions. Admirers of the late Mr. Barden hope to keep alive his ideals through a Barden Chair of Government at Campbell College.
Source:
Record #:
32320
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Charlotte Chamber of Commerce in cooperation with Central Piedmont Community College have generated a unique program for improving the supply of skilled labor in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg area. The community college is helping businesses by providing workers training in technical and trade areas, such as welding and metal work. Several Charlotte welding firms are already beginning intensive drives to recruit people for classes at the community college.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 4, Apr 1969, p33-34, il, por