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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Connor, R.D.W
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Record #:
17216
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Connor discusses the history of postwar planning after the Revolutionary War, the American Civil War, and World War I for the state of North Carolina.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 10 Issue 5, Aug 1944, p4-6, 13-14, 17
Record #:
19567
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The article's author presents a brief biography of Samuel A'Court Ashe. Ashe was a prominent figure in the state's history serving as a soldier, jurist, legislator, editor, and most importantly historian. He edited the 1904 seven volume series Biographical History of North Carolina from Colonial Times to the Present and wrote his own two volume state history entitled simply History of North Carolina.
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Record #:
20366
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This article examines the origins of education systems in North Carolina that would eventually lead to the establishment of institutions of higher learning. The author traces attempts to establish such institutions back as far as 1754, and continues to examine acts of legislature, charters, and colonial issues of establishment, as well as the genesis of the idea of state universities.
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Record #:
22085
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An enthusiastic biographical sketch of Wilmington merchant, planter, and Revolutionary War statesman Cornelius Harnett, Jr.
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Record #:
22152
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This article consists of an assessment of the current condition of historical records in North Carolina in general and a call to action for every resident of the state to assist in the collection, preservation, storage, and utilization of these records about the history of North Carolina for the betterment of the state.
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Record #:
22197
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This article recites the sermon given by Reverend George Micklejohn to Governor Tryon's army at Hillsborough, North Carolina on September 25, 1768. This force had been convened by Governor Tryon to quell insurrection by Regulators in the countryside.
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Record #:
22195
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This article chronicles family and personal deeds of John Harvey who was integral to the colonial government in North Carolina prior to the Revolutionary War and who was also an important cog in the push for independence from England leading up to the Revolution.
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Record #:
22330
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Colonial North Carolina politician Joseph Hewes enjoyed an undeserved reputation for being slow to embrace the cause independence.
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Record #:
22378
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The 1912 dedication of a bust of Governor Morehead in the Hall of the House of Representatives marked the occasion for this review of the contributions of the governor. As both governor and later promoter of the North Carolina Railroad, Morehead greatly improved transportation and commerce within the state. His far-reaching public programs still affect us today.
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Record #:
22452
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According to Seawell Jones, Esther Wake was supposedly a sister-in-law to Governor Tryon for whom Wake County was named. She is also said to have influenced the decision to build a Governor's Palace in New Bern in 1766. More modern historians have disputed her existence. However, letters of several contemporaries provide firm evidence of her influence on colonial affairs.
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