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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 70 Issue 11, Nov 2006
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Record #:
8234
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Commercial fishermen in the state face an increasingly difficult life. They deal with intense state and federal regulations, while facing stiff competition from foreign imports. Fish houses are disappearing, leaving fewer places to sell catches. Boats slips are losing out to developments. A new factor is the tension that exists between commercial fisherman and recreational anglers. Wilson discusses reasons for this tension and what can be done about it.
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Record #:
8230
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Of the three North American species of hognose snake, two occur in North Carolina. The Eastern hognose snake is the more common of the two. It is found throughout the state but is most common in the Coastal Plain. The Southern hognose snake is smaller, more secretive, and more habitat restricted, preferring the Sandhills and southeastern Coastal Plain. Both snakes are harmless, though often mistaken for venomous ones. Their name derives from their wedge-shaped nostril scale, which they use for digging and which gives them a pug-nosed appearance.
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Record #:
8232
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Migratory waterfowl have wintered in North Carolina over the centuries. Following some mysterious, invisible pathway through the sky, the birds fly in from the Dakotas, Canada, and far beyond the Artic Circle. Hester describes some of these autumnal visitors, including the mallard, wood duck, northern pintail, American wigeon, and tundra swan.
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Record #:
8233
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Bolen reviews the lives and philosophies of three conservation giants whose ideas can be tied to the conservation of endangered species and help answer the question: Why should we care? The conservationists are John Muir (1838-1914); Gifford Pinchot (1865-1946); and Aldo Leopold (1887-1948).
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