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6 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 63 Issue 8, Aug 1999
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Record #:
4629
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Some of the state's declining species, including black bear, deer, wild turkey, and bald eagle, made remarkable recoveries during the 20th-century. The challenge of the 21st-century will be to protect and conserve wildlife in a time when population, urban sprawl, and intolerance for wildlife are increasing.
Record #:
4598
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Why are so few dead creatures - mice, shrews, moles, birds, chipmunks, and others - not seen in the woodlands? The answer is the burying beetle, or more formally, Nictophores tomentosus. When the sun goes down, these beetles go to work, locating and burying the dead. Creatures the size of a mouse can be buried in two to three hours. Pollution is eliminated, and raw materials return to the soil to nourish plant growth. Nineteen species of beetles work in North Carolina.
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Record #:
4599
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Herpetologists catch and study reptiles and amphibians. Jeff Beane, Herpetology Collections Manager at the North Carolina State Museum of Natural History, in Raleigh, discusses his work.
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Record #:
4616
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Over 5 percent (11,129) of all traffic accidents reported in North Carolina in 1997 involved deer/vehicle collisions. The majority of these occurred in the eastern half of the state. Hyde County, for example, reported that deer were involved in 40 percent of all accidents. Half of this kind of accident typically occurs in fall and early winter, and 75 percent happens between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. About 8 percent of drivers are injured, but most of the damage is sustained by the deer and the vehicle.
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Record #:
4627
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Plants have been used for medicinal purposes since prehistoric times. In the United States the greatest concentration of medicinal plants is in the Southern Appalachians, where plants were used at first by the Native Americans and early settlers. Modern medicine still uses many today, such as foxglove, for digitalis to treat heart trouble; witch hazel, used in cosmetics; and goldenseal, an ingredient in eye drop preparations.
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Record #:
4626
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The red drum is North Carolina's state fish. Once a highly prized game fish, overfishing and pollution have reduced its numbers. To restore them, the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries set strict new regulations, including reducing the daily catch from five to one. Arrington compares the red drum's situation now to the way it used to be earlier in the 20th-century.
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