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5 results for Traffic accidents
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Record #:
3226
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1994, between 8,000 and 9,000 of the 219,000 automobile accidents compiled by the UNC Highway Safety Research Center involved deer. Most accidents occurred in the Coastal Plain during fall hunting season.
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Subject(s):
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Record #:
17668
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Supreme Court throughout its history has had to decide which forms of scientific evidence are credible in court. In the 1960s, the court decided submission of evidence from skid marks to determine the speed of a vehicle at the scene of an automobile accident was admissible. The court considered cases from other states before making this decision.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 29 Issue 3-4, Oct 1962, p19-21, 24
Subject(s):
Record #:
4616
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over 5 percent (11,129) of all traffic accidents reported in North Carolina in 1997 involved deer/vehicle collisions. The majority of these occurred in the eastern half of the state. Hyde County, for example, reported that deer were involved in 40 percent of all accidents. Half of this kind of accident typically occurs in fall and early winter, and 75 percent happens between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. About 8 percent of drivers are injured, but most of the damage is sustained by the deer and the vehicle.
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Record #:
4991
Author(s):
Abstract:
Automobile accidents involving deer continue to rise. Over 5.6 percent (12,233) of all traffic accidents reported in the state in 1999 involved deer/vehicle collisions. This compares with 5 percent (11,503) accidents reported in 1998. Hyde County continued its high accident percentage with 54 accidents involving deer and 88 not.
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Record #:
31062
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Tar Heel economy took a $207 million whack from traffic accidents last year. The immense dollar loss came from highway deaths, injuries, hospital and funeral expenses, loss of income, property damage, and lawsuits. The year's traffic toll included 1,254 fatalities, and over 34,000 injuries, with 60,000 mishaps reported. Only four of the 100 counties in the state escaped without a fatality from traffic accidents.