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5 results for Water Resources Research Institute News Vol. Issue 247, Nov/Dec 1987
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Record #:
33575
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Agricultural Cost Share Program for Nonpoint Source Pollution Control, which provides farmers up to seventy-five-percent of the cost of implementing conservation practices to reduce agricultural pollution of water bodies, was initiated in 1985 in sixteen counties in nutrient-sensitive watersheds. The program has produced both environmental and economic benefits, and is expanding to include additional counties.
Record #:
33579
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nuisance blooms of blue-green algae have caused water quality problems in the Chowan and Neuse Rivers, and the potential for similar algal problems is uncertain in new impoundments such as the Jordan and the Falls of the Neuse reservoirs. Dr. Val Smith in the Department of Biology at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill has developed models predicting algae biomass and applied the models to North Carolina reservoirs.
Record #:
33577
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edward J. Kuenzler, professor of environmental biology at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, conducted a study of two North Carolina swamps receiving municipal effluent. The study was funded by the Water Resources Research Institute and provides recommendations for long-term management of swamps and natural treatment of wastewater effluent.
Record #:
33578
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill have been conducting laboratory research on pollutant biodegradation in subsurface soils for several years. They are investigating aquifer contamination in eastern North Carolina, and testing biotechnology for cleaning up groundwater pollution.
Record #:
33576
Author(s):
Abstract:
After receiving a report on water supply and use in the Eno River Area, the Environmental Management Commission instructed the Division of Environmental Management to hold public hearings on the need to designate the Eno River Area a Capacity Use Area. The designation would enable water-use allocations and regulations for the area.