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10 results for Tar Heel Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978
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Record #:
6253
Author(s):
Abstract:
Louise Thaden, 73, now lives in High Point. In the 1920s, she was a pioneer aviatrix, breaking international airplane records for altitude, speed, solo endurance, light plane speed, East-West speed, and 100-kilometer speed. She was the first woman to enter the Bendix Transcontinental race in 1936. She won first prize.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p48-49, il
Record #:
6252
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Brantley Aycock Brown, ad man, photographer-publicist, Outer Banks huckster, and legend, is profiled in this Tar Heel article.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p9-10, 44-45, il, por
Record #:
35678
Author(s):
Abstract:
With a Tar Heel reporter interviewing, readers might have expected to hear how Northern producers could comfortably integrate their business into Southern culture. With the NC Shakespeare Festival’s prominence, another expectation could have been these producers’ plan could make theatre a more popular form of entertainment for all.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p12-14, 36-40
Record #:
35676
Abstract:
Joseph Seawell Jones was known as a hoax master. His talent originated during his boyhood in Shocco Creek and continued through academic stints at the University of North Carolina and Harvard. One hoax was a bank caper orchestrated in Columbus, Missouri. It involved “Cape Fear Money,” actually blank slips of paper, and “Public Documents,” actually old newspapers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p17-19, 56-57
Record #:
35680
Abstract:
Touted also as the first total, natural habitat zoo, it included animals representing all seven continents, terrestrial or aquatic. What made this zoo possible: its location near Asheboro; financial backers such as the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation; a growing public support base through the Zoological Society; and thirteen zookeepers passionate about their work.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p24-26
Record #:
35679
Author(s):
Abstract:
Walking was recommended as part of backpacking and hiking experiences. For the best experiences, the author suggested considering supplies, rental prices, the pack’s weight, and ways to avoid littering. Sites such as Morrow Mountain State Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway, and Mount Mitchell were recommended. Included were tips for new backpackers and hikers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p20-23
Record #:
35683
Author(s):
Abstract:
He was a living anachronism to many living in Banner Elk and Boone. For people regarding Appalachia as timelessly valuable, Edd Presnell was living testimony. As for how he contributed to this lifeway’s persistence, it could be perceived in the handmade dulcimers he sold during his visit to the State Fair and wood he burned when oil was too expensive.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p48-49
Record #:
35681
Abstract:
Shrubs that can make a lovely addition to a landscape included Pyracantha and Holly, according to the author. How they can be useful to creatures of the two or many legged kind include becoming a border for a walkway or food for birds. Factors to consider for making them a valuable part of the landscape: types of fertilizer, pruning times, optimal planting depths, and common shrub problems.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p31-33
Subject(s):
Record #:
35677
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hospice, originating during the 19th century, was an idea worth exploring again. A company assuring this type of care could provide death with dignity was Winston-Salem’s Hospice of North Carolina, Inc. How this was possible, according to its director, was being comfortable during one’s remaining time and at peace with the impending end of life.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p7, 42-43
Record #:
35682
Author(s):
Abstract:
Trash almost anyone could recycle had this reward: reducing pollution. Lest anyone needed an extrinsic incentive for this eco-friendly measure, there was the potential for profitability. Items to be contributed for cash included returnable bottles, paper, scrap metal, aluminum, and glass.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p34-35