NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Banner Elk--Description and travel
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4331
Author(s):
Abstract:
Banner Elk, with a population of 600 plus 600 Lees-McRae Colleges students, grew from a sleepy mountain village to a popular travel spot. The change began in 1984 with the opening of the Elk River Club. Wealthy members built spectacular homes. Demands for more services increased. Today Banner Elk is a mixture of town, gown, and tourists, along with new restaurants, and a variety of accommodations and shops.
Source:
Record #:
6864
Author(s):
Abstract:
Banner Elk, located in Avery County, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. The town of approximately 1,000 people dates back to the arrival of Martin Luther Banner in 1848. Tourism is the major force of its economy. Between July and October, as many as 15,000 people will come on weekends to shop, enjoy the scenery, visit the many restaurants, or attend the town's famous Wooly Worm Festival. The town's quiet allure and scenic beauty attracts second-home owners. Lees-McRae College, with a student of body of 700, has been a Banner Elk institution for over 100 years and contributes to the cultural scene by bringing novelists, musicians, and other artists to the campus.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p18-20, 22, il, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
30590
Author(s):
Abstract:
Diamond Creek golf resort caters to the nation's wealthiest, by offering helicopter taxi service from Charlotte and world class dining. In 2009 Bill and Anita Greene moved their restaurant Artisanal to the area.
Source:
Record #:
35683
Author(s):
Abstract:
He was a living anachronism to many living in Banner Elk and Boone. For people regarding Appalachia as timelessly valuable, Edd Presnell was living testimony. As for how he contributed to this lifeway’s persistence, it could be perceived in the handmade dulcimers he sold during his visit to the State Fair and wood he burned when oil was too expensive.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p48-49