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10 results for Dulcimer
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Record #:
1103
Author(s):
Abstract:
The annual Appalachian Dulcimer Player Workshop has been held one week each summer at Appalachian State University since 1978.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 1, June 1993, p19-20, por
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Record #:
4096
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Abstract:
Leonard Glenn was one of the great builders of banjos and dulcimers. He was also an expert performer on them. In his Laurel Creek workshop, he created instruments that brought orders from all over the country. In 1992, he received a North Carolina Folk Heritage Award for continuing the traditional building of mountain instruments.
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Record #:
5591
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Abstract:
The musicians are well known. Lesser known are craftsmen who make their instruments. Leonard Glenn of Watauga County received a 1992 North Carolina Folk Heritage Award for building traditional mountain banjos and dulcimers.
Record #:
9478
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hance discusses the development of the dulcimer in the mountains of North Carolina and the craftsmen who make them today.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p172-174, 176, 178, 180, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10345
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Bob Gernandt moved to the mountains from Durham over thirty years ago. He taught himself how to build dulcimers, at first using local woods, like walnut and cherry. As he became more successful, his woods expanded to Hawaiian koa and Oregon myrtle and native wood, like maple and spruce. Hammond discusses his work and his creations beyond dulcimers.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 5, Oct 2008, p170-172, 174-176, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10832
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Abstract:
The Appalachian, mountain, or plucked dulcimer--the adjectives are interchangeable--is not the same instrument as one called by that name in the Bible (Daniel 3:5). Nor is it the trapezoidal harp-like forerunner of the piano, as described in Webster's Dictionary. The mountain dulcimer is an entirely homogenous and unique handmade creation, distinct from any other stringed instrument. The mountain dulcimer, with two to eight strings, most commonly three, large tuning pegs and a fretted fingerboard, has a borrowed name but is a decidedly original instrument that was very likely spontaneously developed in the Appalachian Mountain region.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 3, July 1967, p9-11, 43, il
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Record #:
11256
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Lowder describes the work and creations of Ed Presnell and his wife who make dulcimers and banjoes at their mountain home between Banner Elk and Vilas.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 3, July 1965, p10, por
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Record #:
16462
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Appalachian, mountain, or plucked dulcimer is not the same instrument as one called by that name in the Bible. Nor is it the trapezoidal harp-like forerunner of the piano described in Webster's Dictionary. The mountain dulcimer seems an entirely homogeneous and unique handmade creation, distinct from any other stringed musical instrument.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35683
Author(s):
Abstract:
He was a living anachronism to many living in Banner Elk and Boone. For people regarding Appalachia as timelessly valuable, Edd Presnell was living testimony. As for how he contributed to this lifeway’s persistence, it could be perceived in the handmade dulcimers he sold during his visit to the State Fair and wood he burned when oil was too expensive.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p48-49
Record #:
37423
Author(s):
Abstract:
The dulcimer, often associated with Western North Carolina, found places other than the region’s lumber mills and was found long before the nineteenth century. Introduced in Europe by returning Crusaders, its origins can be traced back to Greece and the Near East.