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11 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999
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Record #:
4410
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Abstract:
The 20th-century brought new ways to the state's citizens. Many enjoyed the new \"soft\" drinks, like Pepsi, or drank mineral water for their health. Newly completed railroad lines opened the state to all classes of people. Vacations were no longer the province of the rich; trips to the mountains, beaches, or mineral springs were available to all. People also turned to new sports, like football and baseball, for leisure-time amusement.
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Record #:
4416
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A political crisis developed in North Carolina in the 1890s with the formation of the Populist Party, a combination of disgruntled farmers, blacks, and whites. Populists voted for Republicans supportive of their needs and helped them capture the legislature in 1894 and the governorship in 1896. Democrats turned to racism in order to recapture power in 1900. To insure they would stay in power, Democrats passed a constitutional amendment disenfranchising blacks.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p16-18, il, por
Record #:
4415
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Abstract:
Sallie Southall Cotten felt that together women could achieve great things. In 1899, she organized the End of the Century Club in Greenville for women to discuss books and sponsor community service projects. In 1902, she was a force in founding the North Carolina Federation of Women's Clubs, an organization that enabled women statewide to speak as a group for public school improvement, prison reform, and aid to the poor and elderly.
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Record #:
4418
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At the start of the 20th-century, three industries were gaining prominence -- tobacco, textiles, and furniture. Each made its influence felt in a different geographic location. Tobacco was the Coastal Plain's big moneymaker. Two hundred textile plants spurred growth in the Piedmont, encouraging farmers to grow more cotton. Furniture factories developed in the foothills, near their source of raw materials.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p23-25, il
Record #:
4417
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Born a slave in Bladen County, George White graduated from Howard University and returned to North Carolina to practice law. He joined the Republican Party and was elected to the General Assembly in the 1880s. He later was prosecuting attorney for the Second Congressional District. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from 1897-1901. He was the last former slave to serve in Congress and the last African American elected from the South to Congress until 1972.
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Record #:
4412
Abstract:
The Horne Creek Living Historical Farm, located near the Yadkin River in Surry County, gives visitors the feel of farm life in 1900. Owned by the Hauser family, it was farmed before and after the Civil War. The Hauser family was self-sufficient, raising livestock and growing crops for food. What few things they purchased were sugar, salt, and flavorings, like vanilla.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
4419
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The Southern textile industry relied on child labor. Between 1880 and 1910, around one-fourth of the workforce was under the age of sixteen; many laborers were as young as seven. Soon reformers questioned the use of children as laborers working long hours. In 1913, North Carolina and other states passed laws restricting the hours children could work. Many manufacturers ignored the laws. It would be another ten years before child labor reforms became effective.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p28-30, il
Record #:
4414
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Abstract:
For women, opportunities beyond the home were limited in 1900 to such jobs as seamstress, teacher, or store clerk. After marriage most women could look forward to a life of keeping house and raising their families. This could be a challenge since they lacked the modern household conveniences of today. Washing clothes could be an all day job, for example. In 1900, women were starting a century that would dramatically transform their lives.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p10-12, il
Record #:
4413
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Those living in the country in 1900 depended on the country store for all their home and farm needs, even the mail. Two events at the start of the 20th-century lessened this dependency. The automobile meant people could drive to town, where there were more stores. The start of Rural Free Delivery (RFD) routes brought mail to the home, eliminating the need to pick it up at the country store.
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Record #:
4420
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Alexander J. McKelway advocated child labor reform. As editor of the NORTH CAROLINA PRESBYTERIAN, and later the CHARLOTTE NEWS, his views influenced the state, the South and the nation. Among his successes were raising the age limit for child laborers, limiting the hours of work, and requiring school attendance as a condition for employment. He died in 1918 before other reforms he sought became law.
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Record #:
4421
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Abstract:
Four thousand miles of rail lines crisscrossed the state in 1900. Most of them belonged to the Atlantic Coast Line, Seaboard Line, and Southern Railway. In 1900, railroads were the major means of long-distance transportation. Railroads also brought changes. Farmers could raise cash crops now, instead of subsistence farming. New industries grew; old ones expanded. Railroads also influenced urbanization, creating new towns and increasing the size of old ones.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 39 Issue 1, Fall 1999, p32-33, il
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