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5 results for Cotten, Sallie Southall, 1846-1929
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Record #:
4415
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sallie Southall Cotten felt that together women could achieve great things. In 1899, she organized the End of the Century Club in Greenville for women to discuss books and sponsor community service projects. In 1902, she was a force in founding the North Carolina Federation of Women's Clubs, an organization that enabled women statewide to speak as a group for public school improvement, prison reform, and aid to the poor and elderly.
Source:
Record #:
10014
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sallie Southall Cotton married a Confederate Army officer after the Civil War and raised a family. Most women of that period settled in to do “womanly things” after their families had grown, but Mrs. Cotton embarked on a career of public service. She felt that working together women could achieve great things. In 1902, she was a force in founding the North Carolina Federation of Women's Clubs, an organization that enabled women statewide to speak as a group for public school improvement, prison reform, and aid to the poor and elderly.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 1 Issue 5, Sept 1943, p12-13,, por, bibl
Record #:
21228
Abstract:
A look at the efforts of Sallie Southall Cotten to help bring North Carolina to the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893 (also known as the Chicago World's Fair,) including her work for her state's representation in the national exposition, the knowledge she gained from her work, and the way her work with the exposition transformed her from country wife and mother to public figure and eventual major representative figure of North Carolina women.
Source:
Record #:
11751
Abstract:
Mrs. Sallie Southall Cotton was one of North Carolina's greatest women. Among her accomplishments were organizing in 1899 the End of the Century Club in Greenville for women to discuss books and sponsor community service projects and being a driving force in founding the North Carolina Federation of Women's Clubs, an organization that enabled women statewide to speak as a group for public school improvement, prison reform, and aid to the poor and elderly.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 12, Aug 1934, p7, 22, por
Full Text:
Record #:
36050
Author(s):
Abstract:
The menagerie of movers and shakers in Greenville were profiled in this snapshot in words of how East Carolina University came to be. Accompanying the snapshot in words was a copy of the actual snapshot assembling those twenty-two individuals, taken on July 2, 1908.