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19 results for East Carolina University--History
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Record #:
12208
Abstract:
Founded in 1908 and opened in 1909, East Carolina's Teachers' College, currently known as East Carolina University, opened its doors to the public. By 1921, East Carolina began offering four year degrees and by 1929, the Master of Arts degree was added to the curriculum. The fourth-largest full-fledged college within the state, East Carolina encompasses some 130 acres and continues to attract students nation-wide.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 10, Oct 1957, p19, 21, il
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Record #:
17054
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Abstract:
If there is one overwhelming theme--other than service--to be found in East Carolina University's history, it is the role of the underdog. More often than not, the school and its leaders were told something could not be done, and each time ECU achieved what many thought would be impossible. Like its mascot, the pirate, ECU has always done things outside the expected boundaries and come away with a treasure chest of success.
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Record #:
21480
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This article examines the origins of East Carolina University (ECU) in Greenville, North Carolina, in the framework of the Progressive reforms of the early 20th century. Founded as East Carolina Teachers Training School, ECU sprung from a state wide debate on how to train teachers for an expanding number of schools. Opposed by Piedmont and western interests who did not want another eastern school, the college was approved after a series of bond issues in 1907 and began classes shortly after.
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Record #:
23485
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Samples of trivia include: The East Carolina Band was organized in 1938; the Industrial Arts department was established in 1937; the Commerce Department was organized in 1936; "Beans," was the campus mascot of the 1940s; the first football season was in 1932 and the first football victory was in 1933 over Campbell; the transformation of the college hog lot into a lake and a beautification program; Sylvan Theatre built in the 1950s; the Men’s Glee Club was started in 1952; a small cannon fired at ECU football games in the 1960s; and the history of the student "Y" store.
Record #:
25467
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From a little teachers college to a state-of-the art dental school, East Carolina has come a long way. Schulken reflects on the success of the East Carolina from its inception to the present, its momentum and what needs to be implemented in the future.
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Record #:
25476
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In what is considered by some to be an embarrassing era in East Carolina Teachers College’s history, Amanda Etheridge challenged authority and prevented further misuse of student funds by voicing concerns to the Governor. Despite her aid to the students through Student Government and student journalism, Etheridge was let go from ECTC and her future remained a mystery for nearly 40 years.
Record #:
25482
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New York landscape architect Louis L. Miller was surprised by the growth of ECTTS campus just a mere decade after designing it. Plans were made to expand the campus and in 1922, money was appropriated by the General Assembly. By the end of the decade, six buildings had turned into 16 on nearly 90 acres.
Record #:
25490
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As East Carolina Teachers College transitioned into a four-year college, students were expected to assume more responsibility. President Robert Wright worked with students to create the first student government association. They were given broad powers and praised for their civic consciousness and fairness.
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Record #:
25485
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In a novel approach to aiding recent graduates from the East Carolina Teachers College, Miriam McFayden journeyed from Manteo to the mountains to bring encouragement, advice, and supplies to young alumnae, some working in very rural schools.
Record #:
25567
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One of East Carolina’s original faculty members, Mamie Jenkins taught English for 37 years, but long after retirement she continued to volunteer on campus. Jenkins was one of the first women to graduate from Duke University, and followed this with a masters from Columbia. She served as advisor for the student newspaper and yearbook
Record #:
25576
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Senior Attie Bray (1922) recollects East Carolina’s flu epidemic that struck campus in early 1922. Campus was quarantined and activities shut down for weeks while students where recovering from illness.
Record #:
23706
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Big guns have always been a part of Greenville’s history. The “Brickle Cannon,” located on the Town Common, was manufactured between 1760-70 and was used on board a trading vessel about 1797 for defense against the French during the troubled administration of John Adams. The cannon was used for many years during political campaigns, was thrown in the river, buried innumerable times, drug to Greene Mill Run, and sat at the base of the Confederate monument in Cherry Hill Cemetery. The next big gum was a large artillery piece from WWI which sat in front of the County Court House and then moved to ECTTC in 1926. The large howitzer sat beside the Wilson Pergola in front of what is now Garrett Dorm until 1942 when it was sold for scrap. In 1966, ECU rolled out its spirit cannon and in 1971 a 80 pd. “WWI machine gun” was discovered underneath Fleming Hall. During the Cold War the Greenville National Guard had a 105 Howitzer and in 1963 possessed an “Atomic Cannon,” which took 16 men to operate.
Record #:
23013
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This article gives interesting facts about sports, classes, enrollment, and organization information at East Carolina University such as the East Carolina Band was organized in 1938, the first physical education majors graduated in 1939, the first football team was organized in 1932, the Pre-Med Society was formed in 1939 and the first photocopy machines appeared in Joyner Library in 1968.
Record #:
23505
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In honor of the groundbreaking on July 2, 1908 for the first six buildings at East Carolina Teachers Training School, a pageant "East Carolina's Spade," was written by Emma L. Hooper of the English Department and directed by Dr. Kenneth N. Cuthbert of the Music Department. The pageant produced in 1958 documented the history of East Carolina University, beginning with the groundbreaking ceremony held by ex-governor Jarvis. The play consists of four episodes that chronicle future developments and had an entirely local cast made up of descendants of those at the original groundbreaking.
Record #:
35649
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Leo Jenkins may have earned the title of Daddy in a vicarious sense from his thirty plus years of service at East Carolina University, marked by accomplishments such as establishing East Carolina College as East Carolina University in 1967. In this sense, though, Leo Jenkins was Daddy to his six children, each of whom shared admirable aspects of their father with the author.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 3, May/June 1978, p22-23, 25, 49-51