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8 results for Sea Chest Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973
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Record #:
7541
Abstract:
Maurice Bernard Folb first came to Hatteras Island in 1920. He was a Chief Pharmacist's Mate with the U.S. Navy and was stationed at Cape Hatteras for six years and ten months. Folb gave medical attention to all who needed it, delivering babies and treating various diseases. In this SEA CHEST interview, he discusses traveling about the island to treat patients, the wreck of the Carroll A. Deering, the diphtheria epidemic, and recreation on the island.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p43-51, il
Record #:
7543
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weather observations have been taken on Hatteras Island since 1874. Much of the information on this period is contained in the weather station's log books, which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. The books contain material on weather, shipwrecks, and local happenings. THE SEA CHEST staff compiled entries from 1874 and 1875 to give the reader a feel for what life at a weather station was like.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p20-30, il
Record #:
7542
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clifford Wade was born on Hatteras Island on November 14, 1882 and at present is the island's oldest resident. At the age of twelve he went to work pound net fishing and later worked in the Lightship Service. Wade describes his experiences in the Great August Storm of 1899 and watching General Billy Mitchell sink two battleships with air power off Hatteras Island in 1923.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p55
Record #:
35926
Abstract:
It was proof that fashion—albeit of the folk remedy variety--always comes back around. Among the remedies were recommendations for illnesses such as colds and croup. Others were suggestions for nail and bees sting injuries. Others were proposals for hair and oral health.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p36-39
Record #:
35927
Abstract:
It’s been suggested the Outer Banks dialect was a remnant of Elizabethan age colonial residency. Another unique aspect of Banker speech was common words and phrases. Among the possibly known by other Coastal Plain residents: dingbattin’. Others possibly known by people outside of NC include grub. Others like peelin’ the green may be known only to natives.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p40-43
Record #:
35929
Author(s):
Abstract:
What TJ Evans shared was evidence of the Banks’ long personal history and occasional weavings into the greater tapestry of American history. His stories highlighting the history of Cape Hatteras Island, its lighthouse, and the Banks’ experiences with hurricanes. As for involvement with historical events of greater reported significance, noted was the only direct contact made with the sinking Titanic, from the Cape Hatteras Wireless Station.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p56-58
Record #:
35925
Author(s):
Abstract:
Good weather, necessary for tourism, the Outer Banks’ major income source. Always looming, though, was the possibility of bad weather dampening the trade. Hence, they were dependent upon good weather and vulnerable when it wasn’t: lessons natives learned early in life. Fortunately, they had the wisdom of past generations’ experience to serve as a guide.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p14-15
Record #:
35924
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tourists were a mixed blessing: one part welcoming, one part wary. Welcoming entailed sharing sand and surf with those sunbathing and fishing. Wariness came from some visitors leaving trash and trespass in their wake. It also came from some others bring preconceptions about the natives and assumption that city creature comforts are available.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p3-7