NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


94 results for Recall
Currently viewing results 16 - 30
Previous
PAGE OF 7
Next
Record #:
21507
Author(s):
Abstract:
When England went to war with its American colonies, it was at a distinct disadvantage--3,000 miles of ocean separated them. Communication to and from England could take as much as five months, and there were 1,200 miles of shoreline along the coastal colonies. Cheatham presents six events that should have, for all intents and purposes, prove to King and Parliament that the war was over at the end of 1776. These include the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, the British evacuation of Boston, the Declaration of Independence, and Washington's surprise attack on Trenton, New Jersey in December of that year.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Fall 2009, p1-3, il
Full Text:
Record #:
21514
Abstract:
J. Edgar Parker was born in Elizabeth City, but everyone who knew him called him \"Pinch.\" In 1943, he joined the Marine Corps. Poole's article, a combination of his historical additions and Parker's narrative, recounts the story of one young man's journey through the bloodiest battle of the Pacific War--Okinawa. He was one of only 60 original members of his company of 250 Marines to survive.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Fall 2009, p9-17, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21506
Abstract:
This a fact sheet providing interesting information about North Carolinians who served in World War I, including numbers of men and women who served, number of nurses who served in the US Army, number of men and women who died of disease in service overseas.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Spr 2009, p19, il
Record #:
21515
Author(s):
Abstract:
Maffitt was a Confederate navy captain and a successful blockade runner. He served in the US Navy up to 1861 when he resigned to join the Confederacy. Winstead's article follows Maffitt's career, his actives in the Cape Fear River, and the contributions he made to two nations.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Fall 2009, p17-21, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21517
Abstract:
There has been at least one militia unit in the greater Sanford area since before the American Revolution. Harrington gives a brief history of the Sanford unit from its beginning up to 1980 and its service during the country's wars.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Fall 2009, p22-23
Full Text:
Record #:
21493
Author(s):
Abstract:
Evelyn Whitlow was born in Leasburg, Caswell County. After high school graduation, she trained as a registered nurse, and in May 1940 entered the US Army as a nurse 2nd Lieutenant at Fort Bragg. She was in the Philippines when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. She and other nurses earned the above title for treating soldiers and civilians as their supplies dwindled. Many nurses were successfully evacuated, but Whitlow's plane crashed and all aboard were captured. She was one of eighty-one female prisoners of war held in Manila. These women were the first female POWs in American military history. They were liberated in February 1945. Whitlow died June 3, 1994.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Spr 2008, p6, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21492
Abstract:
Walter G. Atkinson is a native of Leaksville, and on June 6, 1944, D-Day, he landed on Utah Beach in Normandy, France. He relates his experiences from that point to the war's end. He was twice wounded and was awarded the Bronze Star for bravery. Atkinson remained in the army after the war. He was in the Korean War and retired in 1961.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Spr 2008, p4-5, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21495
Author(s):
Abstract:
William F. Martin and Gilbert Elliott received a contract to build the Ironclad Tarboro on the Tar River in 1862. At the same time they were constructing another ironclad, the famous Albemarle, on the Roanoke River. Little information about the Tarboro has come down through history. It was burned during General Potter's Union Cavalry raid on July 20, 1863. Harris relates what is known and why Tarboro was chosen as the construction site.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Fall 2008, p15-17, il, map
Full Text:
Record #:
21494
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colonel Cathey was born in Waynesville. This article describes his experiences in Iraq during the 2nd Gulf War. He received the Bronze Star Medal for bravery, and Taylor includes the narrative which accompanies the award.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Fall 2008, p13-14, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21513
Abstract:
The Battle of the Little Big Horn fought between George Custer's 7th Cavalry and an alliance of Native Americans, primarily Sioux and Cheyenne, under the command of Sitting Bull, is perhaps the best-remembered of the American-Native American wars. Four North Carolinians were there--Harvey A. Fox, Jonathan Robers, John Thadus, and Daniel Alexander Kanipe. Thadus was killed at the battle; Robers was with Major Reno's command; Fox was on detached service; and Kanipe has the distinction of carrying the next-to-last message from Custer. A North Carolinian's invention, which could have turned the tide of battle and which Custer did not take with him from the fort, was Richard Gatling's Gatling Gun.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Fall 2008, p4-6, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21451
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this continuing series profiling North Carolina veterans of World War II, Samuelson recounts the experiences of L. Bethel Griffith of Leaksville, who served as part of the \"Lost Company\" during the war. He was part of Company A, Tenth Amphibian Tractor Battalion, which landed troops during island invasions, brought in ammunition and supplies, and took back the dead and wounded. Company A became separated from its battalion in 1943 and was in combat with various other units without pay or mail for seven months. He was discharged in 1945.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spr 2007, p5-6
Full Text:
Record #:
21454
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ferebee was born on a Davie County farm near Mocksville. After college he joined the Army Air Force before World War II began and trained as a bombardier. He flew over 60 missions over Europe and earned a reputation as one of the best bombardiers in the Air Force. He also made two friends who would be important to him later in the war--Paul Tibbets, a talented pilot, and Theodore van Kirk, a skilled navigator. In 1944 he was ordered back to the US by special request of Colonel Tibbets. On August 6, 1945, with Tibbets flying the Enola Gay, bombardier Thomas Ferebee dropped the first atomic bomb ever used in wartime on the Japanese city of Hiroshima.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spr 2007, p10, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21452
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this continuing series profiling North Carolina veterans of World War II, Samuelson recounts the experiences of Conrad \"Gus\" Shinn of Spray. He was a multi-engine pilot in the South Pacific and flew onto islands where fighting was taking place bringing in blood and medical supplies and taking out the wounded--sometimes under fire. He continued flying with the Navy after the war and took part in special secret operations in Antarctica. In 1956, he was the first pilot to land and take off from the South Pole. Mount Shinn, Antarctica's third highest mountain, is named for him.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spr 2007, p7-8, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21453
Abstract:
Leonard Day, of Morehead City in Carteret County, joined the US Navy on April 9, 1917, three days after Congress declared war on Germany. Harrington recounts his experiences and the ships he served on. On March 4, 1918, Fireman First Class Day and five other North Carolinians were numbered among 306 passengers and crewmen aboard the USS Cyclops which left Barbados bound for Baltimore. Between March 4 and March 13, the ship and everyone on board vanished in the infamous Bermuda Triangle. No trace has ever been found. Day was declared officially to have \"died\" on June 14, 1918.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spr 2007, p9, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21474
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mackintosh recounts the life of then Lieutenant Henry Rowan Lemly of Forsyth County who graduated from West Point and went on to take part in the war against the Sioux Indians with the Third Cavalry under the command of General Crook. He was in a number of battles, including the capture of Crazy Horse and was serving as captain of the guard at Camp Robinson when Crazy Horse was killed. The article includes some of Lemly's writing about the Sioux Wars. He held a number of positions before he finally retired in 1920. He is buried with his wife in Arlington National Cemetery.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Fall 2007, p1-4, il, por, bibl
Full Text: