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8 results for Samuelson, Ken
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Record #:
21365
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this continuing series profiling veterans of World War II, Samuelson recounts the exploits of Jack Woodlieff, who was born in Leaksville. Woodlieff joined the army in January 1942 and was assigned to a number of positions. When the 47th Quartermaster Unit, Graves Registration was formed, he requested assignment. It is hard, unpleasant work that must be done and involves being the funeral director, embalmer, grave digger, hiker and detective--all in one. In North Africa he prepared the body of Captain Richard Jensen, who was General George S. Patton's aide, and was the only person in the tent when Patton came to pay his respects. Woodlief attended the funeral and received a handshake and a compliment from the General for his work.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Spr 2004, p14-15, por
Record #:
21367
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this continuing series profiling veterans of World War II, Samuelson recounts the exploits of William Lashley, who was born in Leaksville. Lashley served with the 2nd Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion, U.S. Marines and went ashore with the invasion force on Okinawa on Easter Sunday 1945. He was in command of the Marine radar stations on shore which were on duty 24 hours a day because the Japanese planes were flying 24 hours a day. After the war he returned home and entered the retail business.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Fall 2004, p21-23
Record #:
21363
Author(s):
Abstract:
Damon Alberty of Greensboro joined the U.S. Army early in 1941 \"to see the big world that surrounded the town.\" He was sent to the Philippines where he was taken prisoner on Bataan after the Japanese invasion and capture of the islands in April 1942. After surviving the Bataan Death March, he was sent to Japan in July 1943 where he did slave labor until the Japanese surrender. Samuelson recounts Alberty's horrific experiences as a prisoner of war from April 1942 till September 1945.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall 2003, p7-8, por
Record #:
21380
Author(s):
Abstract:
Samuelson states that there will probably not be another American combat ace after the Vietnam War ended. General Steve Ritchie, of Reidsville, is the last fighter pilot to earn that distinction by shooting down five North Vietnamese MIG 21 aircraft in 1972.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Spr 2006, p20-21, il
Record #:
21451
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this continuing series profiling North Carolina veterans of World War II, Samuelson recounts the experiences of L. Bethel Griffith of Leaksville, who served as part of the \"Lost Company\" during the war. He was part of Company A, Tenth Amphibian Tractor Battalion, which landed troops during island invasions, brought in ammunition and supplies, and took back the dead and wounded. Company A became separated from its battalion in 1943 and was in combat with various other units without pay or mail for seven months. He was discharged in 1945.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spr 2007, p5-6
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Record #:
21446
Author(s):
Abstract:
Samuelson recounts the exploits of Colonel Robert K. Morgan of Asheville, who was pilot of the Memphis Belle, the first B-17 heavy bomber to complete 25 missions over Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II. At that time in 1943, squadron crew losses were as high as 80 percent, and those who completed 25 missions were sent home. Morgan later flew B-29s and completed 26 missions over Japan. Today, the Memphis Belle is in the Memphis Museum.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Fall 2006, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
21452
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this continuing series profiling North Carolina veterans of World War II, Samuelson recounts the experiences of Conrad \"Gus\" Shinn of Spray. He was a multi-engine pilot in the South Pacific and flew onto islands where fighting was taking place bringing in blood and medical supplies and taking out the wounded--sometimes under fire. He continued flying with the Navy after the war and took part in special secret operations in Antarctica. In 1956, he was the first pilot to land and take off from the South Pole. Mount Shinn, Antarctica's third highest mountain, is named for him.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spr 2007, p7-8, il, por
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Record #:
21492
Abstract:
Walter G. Atkinson is a native of Leaksville, and on June 6, 1944, D-Day, he landed on Utah Beach in Normandy, France. He relates his experiences from that point to the war's end. He was twice wounded and was awarded the Bronze Star for bravery. Atkinson remained in the army after the war. He was in the Korean War and retired in 1961.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Spr 2008, p4-5, por
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