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16 results for Our State Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006
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Record #:
8115
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In western North Carolina a number of routes have been designated as Scenic Byways by the Federal Highway Administration, which funds the National Scenic Byways Program. The article describes side trips and a sampling of restaurants. The byways included are the Forest Heritage Scenic Byway; Appalachian Medley; South Mountain Scenery; Cherohala Skyway; Waterfall Byway; Whitewater Way; New River Valley Byway; Mission Crossing; Little Parkway; Upper Yadkin Way; Black Mountain Rag; French Broad Overview; Nantahala Scenic Byway; Indian Lakes Scenic Byway; Drovers Road; and Pacolet River Byway.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p58-66, 68-76, 78-86, 88-94, 96, 98, 100, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8116
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Dreifus describes three literary festivals in the state that promote reading, writing, and publishing. They are the Novello Festival of Reading, founded in Charlotte in 1991; North Carolina Writers' Network's Fall Conference, founded in Durham in 1985; and the Cape Fear Crime Festival, founded in Wilmington in 2001.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p190-192, 194, il Periodical Website
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8113
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In this ongoing series about favorite Southern dishes, Garner discusses the delights of collard greens, their history, and how to prepare and serve them. He lists several eating establishments that serve good collard greens: Bum's Restaurant (Ayden); The Coffee Cup (Charlotte); and Bo's Café (Kenansville).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p36-38, 40, 42, 44-45, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8117
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Jackson describes three bed-and-breakfast inns that were converted from the residences of doctors. They are the Augustus T. Zevely Inn (Winston-Salem); Dr. Flippin's Bed and Breakfast (Pilot Mountain); and the 1847 Blake House Inn (Asheville).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p206-208, 210-213, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8122
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By the late 1880s and early 1900s, accessible forests in the state's eastern sections had been cleared by loggers. Much of the remaining virgin forests lay in the remote, rugged western counties. Transporting this timber to market was neither safe nor economical. To overcome this problem, flumes were developed. A flume is a wooden trough, built in a V-shaped manner and filled with water, by which the logs could be transported safely and efficiently. They resembled train trestles and could reach heights of forty feet. In 1907, the Giant Lumber Company constructed the longest flume ever built in North Carolina. It reached nineteen miles across Wilkes County from the company lumberyard into the vast timber properties. In June 1916, a catastrophic flood, produced by a hurricane, washed the flume out in several places. The flume was never rebuilt.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p124-126, 128-129, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8119
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Salisbury, established in 1755, is the county seat of Rowan County. The town welcomes growth and is business-friendly, but at the same time does not want to compromise its small-town values and quality of life. A former mill town, Salisbury's economy rests on locally-based businesses, like Food Lion, Cheerwine, and Power Curbers. Many of the historic structures in the downtown area are preserved. Visitors can take an informative trolley tour and see sights including the Old Presbyterian Bell Tower, Rowan County Museum, the Old Drug Store, the Utzman-Chambers House, and the Salisbury National Cemetery, which contains the remains of over 5,000 Union soldiers who died at the Salisbury Prison.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p18-20, 22, 24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8120
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The story of the Plott hound begins in 1750 when Johannes Plott emigrated to colonial America from Heidelberg, Germany. He brought with him two Hanoverian-type Schweisshunds (bloodhounds). Plott eventually settled in New Bern, married, had three sons, and then moved on to Cabarrus County. His descendants continued to live in the Smoky Mountains and breed the dogs. The Plott hound is an intelligent animal, has a formidable reputation as a hunter, and tends to be a one-person dog. In 1946, the dog was recognized by the United Kennel Club, and years later by the American Kennel Club. On August 12, 1989, the North Carolina General Assembly officially recognized the Plott hound as the State Dog. At the time, few North Carolinians had ever heard of the hound, much less seen one.
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8123
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Traditional mountain music has not fared well over the past decades, and among the younger generations, it was fast becoming almost unknown. Helen White, a guidance counselor for eighteen years in the Alleghany County Schools, is an award-winning songwriter/composer and Fiddlers Grove champion fiddler. Aware of this problem, White began a program at Sparta Elementary School called the Junior Appalachian Musicians program. Students have the opportunity to learn the mandolin, dulcimer, banjo, fiddle, or guitar. Schulman discusses the program's progress since its inception in 2000.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p132-134, 136, 138, il Periodical Website
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8121
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Linville Caverns in McDowell County was discovered in 1822 by two fishermen. The cave is estimated to be over twenty million years old. Water dissolving the limestone and dolomite formed the natural passageways. In 1937, a local corporation bought the cave to develop it for tourism. The caverns opened in 1939 and were a huge success. A massive flood devastated the county in 1940, and the corporation sold out. Spencer and Mildred Collins bought the stock and took over management of cave. Linville Caverns, the state's only show cavern, is operated as a family business that has passed down through several generations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p104-106, 108, 110-111, il Periodical Website
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8124
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Margaret Morley, a well-known biologist, writer, illustrator, and educator, visited North Carolina's mountains in the 1890s. She was quite taken with the region and eventually settled in Tryon. In 1913, she wrote THE CAROLINA MOUNTAINS, a work that recorded her impressions of mountaineer life at the beginning of the 20th-century. A century later, it is considered one of the best books about the North Carolina high country where a way of life has now vanished.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p140-142, 144, 146, 148, il, por Periodical Website
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8125
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Renowned wildlife photographer Bill Lea resides in Franklin and has been photographing wildlife since 1978. He estimates that he has had almost 6,000 of his photographs published. His photographs have been showcased in two coffee table books: GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS WILDLIFE PORTFOLIO and GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS WONDER. A third book will be published in the spring of 2007.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p150-152, 154, 156, 158, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8127
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On November 10, 2003, Congress designated twenty-five counties western North Carolina and the Qualla Boundary as the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area. Cissna discusses how this designation affected the region.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p160-162, 164, 166-167, il Periodical Website
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8130
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In 1980, the red wolf was declared extinct in the wild. Breeding programs conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have brought the animal back. There are thirty-eight places in the United States that conduct captive breeding programs, but the only place in the world where red wolves roam in the wild is in eastern North Carolina on the 1.7-million acre Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. Daniel discusses the Red Wolf Howling Safari, a two-hour program conducted on Wednesday nights in the summer and on special nights the rest of the year. The wolves are never seen, but sometimes they will howl back at their human imitators.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p198-200, 202, 204, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8129
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The Grove Arcade in Asheville, completed in 1929, is the biggest commercial building in western North Carolina and fills an entire city block. Developed by Edwin Wiley Grove, the Grove Arcade is an architectural treasure and is included in the National Register of Historic Places. During World War II, the Federal Government took over the building and evicted all the tenants. Later, it was boarded up and used to house government documents. Through the efforts of the Grove Arcade Public Market Foundation, the Grove Arcade underwent historical renovations, reopening in 2002. Currently about fifty diverse businesses operate there.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p178-180, 182, 184, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8132
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Batik is a 2,000-year-old art form. Its origin is unknown, although many people give the credit to Indonesia. Batik, a labor-intensive, time-consuming technique, is the application of a design on fabric using successive layers of removable wax to protect certain areas from being exposed to certain dyes. The process can take weeks and months, depending on the complexity of the piece. Raleigh batik artist Amy Chapman Braun talks about her technique and creations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p218-220, 222, 224, il Periodical Website
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