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11 results for Our State Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005
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Record #:
7014
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Today North Carolinians have modern appliances like gas-packs to heat their homes, electric stoves to cook their food, and refrigerators to cool and preserve food and provide ice. La Vere discusses the times before these conveniences when North Carolinians used coal for heating and cooking and imported ice from New England for cooling. Use of coal started after the Civil War and continued till around 1950. The first ice shipment from the north reached Wilmington in 1817, and shipments continued until 1902. Artificially made ice made importing it impractical.
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7009
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The North Carolina Award is the highest civilian honor given by the state for a lifetime of achievement in selected fields. In November 2004, seven more North Carolinians were added to this prestigious list of recipients. They are Voit Gilmore, environmentalist; Dr. Walter J. Harrelson, Bible scholar and educator; William Ivey Long, costume designer; Penelope Niven, writer and teacher; Elizabeth Matheson, photographer; LeRoy T. Walker, track coach; and Dr. Annie Louise Wilkerson, physician.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005, p92-96, 98-99, por Periodical Website
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7013
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West Jefferson in Ashe County owes its origin to the railroad. The town incorporated in 1915, and the Norfolk & Western's Virginia-Carolina line arrived the same year. The line was abandoned in 1972. Today a vibrant downtown district that includes a mix of art galleries, restaurants, and specialty shops attracts tourists. Mountain scenery and the town's proximity to the New River also draw visitors to the area.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7012
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People associate the automobile industry with northern cites, but in the early 20th-century over 100,000 automobiles were assembled in North Carolina. Turner discusses the history of the first Model A Ford Town Sedan purchased in Winston-Salem in 1931.
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7020
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Kenneth Walsh of Wilkesboro in Wilkes County is a painter, storyteller, and curator of the Trail of The Eagle Museum. His art is called outsider art, or art created by a person untrained in the classical sense. His work has sold for over $5,000. The museum takes its name from a round-the-country trip Walsh and his wife took in 1990. The object was to travel to each state and acquire the state seal and the governor's signature. Halfway through the trip, Walsh traced the driving route and the trail was in the shape of an eagle, hence the museum's name. The museum features flags and state seals from the fifty states.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005, p130-133, il, por Periodical Website
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7017
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Dr. John Shelton Reed has made a career of studying, observing, and sharing with the world what it means to be a Southerner. He had written ten books about the South, edited three others, and written numerous magazine essays to help others understand the region. Reed founded and directed the University of North Carolina's Center for the Study of the American South at Chapel Hill.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005, p106-108, 110, por Periodical Website
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7015
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Julian Abele is considered the first major African American architect in the country. During his forty-four-year career he designed 650 buildings, among them the stately mansion of James B. Duke in New York City in 1912. So impressed was Duke that when it came time to pick the architect to design Duke University, he chose Abele. Jackson discusses Abele's life and his creations at the Duke campus.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005, p34-36, 38, il, por Periodical Website
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7019
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In 1915, the world's largest recorded chestnut tree stood in Haywood County and measured seventeen feet in diameter. Today, North Carolina's largest recorded chestnut stands at Wayah Bald and measures sixteen inches around. In the intervening years, chestnut trees in the Appalachian region were nearly wiped out by a devastating blight. In Asheville, a branch of the American Chestnut Foundation is working to restore these once-mighty trees to the forests.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005, p120-125, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7018
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W. R. Edmonds's small pamphlet \"The North Carolina State Flag,\" published in 1911, is the most authoritative resource available on the state's flag. Edmonds was a member of the North Carolina Historical Commission when he wrote the pamphlet, which is about three and a half pages in length, followed by four pages of footnotes. Kerr discusses some of the interesting facts from the text.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005, p112-114, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7021
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Edgecombe County was created in 1741, and Tarboro, the county seat, is the country's premier town for highlighting historic architecture. The Town Common in Tarboro, created in 1760, is the only remaining colonial era town common in North Carolina. Westbrook discusses county history, visitors' points of interest, and the effects of the flood of 1999 on Tarboro and Princeville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005, p136-140, il Periodical Website
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7016
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Drew Langsner is the owner and instructor at Country Workshops Woodworking School in Madison. There, he and others teach traditional mountain woodworking skills using the traditional tools. Classes include chairmaking, bowl and spool carving, cooking, quilting, and ceramic instruction.
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