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5 results for Edgecombe County--Description and travel
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Record #:
7021
Abstract:
Edgecombe County was created in 1741, and Tarboro, the county seat, is the country's premier town for highlighting historic architecture. The Town Common in Tarboro, created in 1760, is the only remaining colonial era town common in North Carolina. Westbrook discusses county history, visitors' points of interest, and the effects of the flood of 1999 on Tarboro and Princeville.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005, p136-140, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7966
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1997, Nash and Edgecombe Counties merged their separate economic development efforts into a public-private partnership called the Carolina Gateway Partnership. The partnership is composed of leaders from the counties and eighteen municipalities. The region's largest city, Rocky Mount, lies in both counties, with the county line running down Main Street. Since its inception the partnership has facilitated the arrival of thirty new industries and helped eighteen more remain or expand. Wright discusses the revitalization of Rocky Mount after the flood of 1999.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 6, June 2006, p25-26, 28-30, 32-34, 37-40, 42-44, il
Record #:
18455
Author(s):
Abstract:
Continuing his travels around the state, Goerch reaches Edgecombe County. It is a county that has produced such famous men as Col. Louis D. Wilson, Elias Carr, Henry L. Wyatt, and many others. It is a place with a rich colorful history. Goerch describes a number of interesting places in Tarboro and other parts of the county.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 30, Dec 1941, p1-4, 19-21, 23, il
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Record #:
35643
Author(s):
Abstract:
Earl Roberson was the man with the Edgecombe experience. His experience had encouraged many to peg him a Renaissance man. This Renaissance man earned his title through a full life experience, one lived in Edgecombe and far beyond. It could be measured in his learning how to ski while in the army and restoring a local historical house, in a Master’s from Butler University, Indiana and an administrative position at Edgecombe Technical Institute.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1978, p18-21, 45