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7 results for Edgecombe County--History
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Record #:
23151
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Twin County Museum and Hall of Fame preserves and presents the history of Edgecombe and Nash counties, while also celebrating important community members.
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Record #:
24784
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early twentieth century, Tarboro became the first city in the country to operate a municipal milk plant. In 1917, many townspeople became sick due to contaminated milk, prompting Edgecombe County health officer Dr. K.E. Miller to lobby the town commission to open a municipal milk plant. By the end of 1918, the city raised enough money to build the plant, which stayed open for 47 years and inspired other cities across the country to pasteurize milk for their citizens.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 8, January 2016, p30, 32, 35, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
39527
Author(s):
Abstract:
Counties like Nash and Edgecombe, historically agrarian, have been developing a strong manufacturing base in the past few decades. Generating economic and job growth for towns like Rocky Mount and Tarboro are industrial recruiters like Carolinas Gateway Partnership, companies like Tyson Foods, Inc., and projects like the Carolina Connector intermodal rail terminal.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 37 Issue 8, August 2017, p90, 92, 94, 96, 98-101 Periodical Website
Record #:
40067
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Abstract:
A new data base appeared on Ancestry.com entitled Edgecombe County, North Carolina, Vital Records, 1720-1880. This was supposedly taken from a book entitled ‘Early Families of Edgecombe County, North Carolina, Its Past and Present, published in 1881 by the Ladies’ Tarboro, N.C. Genealogy and Library Association for the Preservation, Dissemination and Exultation of the History of Edgecombe County, N.C.’ and given by Cynthia Herrin of Rochester, Michigan. Research cannot find an extant copy in the United States and apparently Cynthia Herrin threw away the only known copy after compiling the database. The information in the book lists unknown places, people who never existed in Edgecombe County and large amounts of misinformation.