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9 results for Tarboro--Description and travel
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Record #:
3392
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Tarboro, in Edgecombe County, features a 45-block historic district-one of the state's largest - that includes Calvary Episcopal Church, the Blount-Bridgers House, the 1760 Town Common, and the restored town fountain.
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Record #:
6716
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Tarboro was settled in 1732 and has been the county seat of Edgecombe County since 1741. It is a town rich in history. Tarboro and Boston are the country's only cities retaining town commons established by legislative act in 1760. The commons in Tarboro is surrounded by a forty-five block historic district. Lea discusses the history and architecture of the town and how Tarboro coped with the great flood produced by Hurricane Floyd in 1999.
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Record #:
12451
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Our State magazine's features Tarboro in its Tar Heel Town of the Month section. The Edgecombe County town experienced a devastating flood after Hurricane Floyd in 1999.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 3, Aug 2010, p26-30, 32, -33, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
14687
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Edgecombe County, named after Richard first Baron of Edgecombe, once encompassed an area equal to 17 modern era counties drawn from Bertie Precinct in 1732. Initially the county seat was Enfield, and then moved to Halifax, before finally being established at Tarboro. Tarboro, then Tarborough, was incorporated September 23, 1760 and historically the spelling was not agreed upon until January 14, 1898 by the Post Office that recognized only the current spelling. In 1947, Tarboro represented a vibrant county seat with modern hospitals, public facilities, and industry.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 46, Apr 1947, p20-27, il
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Record #:
17242
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Tarboro, located in Edgecombe County, is featured in THE STATE's series on North Carolina cities. It is a city of commerce and industry. Among items described are the Tarboro milk plant, which is municipally owned and is the only one like it in the country and only one of three in the world; city government; hospital; the soy bean and peanut crushery; and the city schools.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 52, May 1939, p25-32, il
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Record #:
24862
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As part of its spring arts festival, Tarboro will be hosting an April performance and ten-day workshop by the New York Theatre Ballet. Events will also include a memorial exhibition in honor of Edgecombe native Hobson Pittman. Pitman was renowned for paintings evoking the South. The festival will conclude with a Gala will be held on April 30.
Record #:
28480
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Abstract:
Princeville came back stronger after hurricane Floyd’s, but the devastation of hurricane Matthew is proving too much for many in the historic town. Many residents are struggling to rebuild and others have decided to sell their properties to the Federal Emergency Management Authority. The differences the hurricane has had on Tarboro and Princeville are also compared and contrasted.
Record #:
40294
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This is the observations of a soldier from the 56th Regiment visiting Tarboro for the first time that appeared in the Fayetteville Observer, Nov. 20, 1862.