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4 results for State flags--North Carolina
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Record #:
7018
Author(s):
Abstract:
W. R. Edmonds's small pamphlet \"The North Carolina State Flag,\" published in 1911, is the most authoritative resource available on the state's flag. Edmonds was a member of the North Carolina Historical Commission when he wrote the pamphlet, which is about three and a half pages in length, followed by four pages of footnotes. Kerr discusses some of the interesting facts from the text.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 9, Feb 2005, p112-114, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9111
Author(s):
Abstract:
The centennial of the signing of the Declaration of Independence was observed in Philadelphia in 1876. Although many Southern states still felt resentment toward the North following the Civil War, the Ladies Memorial Association of Wake County decided to provide a flag to the celebration. Raising the necessary funds, the women commissioned Reverend Johannes Adam Simon Oertel to design the flag. The front, of which only one known photograph survives, consisted of the allegorical figures of liberty and prosperity in the center bordered by white oak and holly. The back, of which no picture exists, was an emblematic description of the Old North State. Although the flag was displayed until 1943, it has since been misplaced and efforts to locate it have proven futile.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p12-13, 16, il
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Record #:
9737
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Abstract:
William Powell, professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is attempting to change the flag of North Carolina. One of the dates that appears on the flag has been challenged by history scholars, and Powell has suggested using the original colony's flag instead. That flag, which is white and has a red cross of St. George on it, was the one the Lost Colony flew.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 12, May 1977, p19-20, il, por
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Record #:
6194
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the nation's largest flag collections, which contains over 320 items dating from the American Revolution to the present, is housed in Raleigh in the North Carolina Museum of History. The oldest flag dates from 1781 and is thought to have been carried at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse.
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