NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


19 results for Our State Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
6864
Author(s):
Abstract:
Banner Elk, located in Avery County, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. The town of approximately 1,000 people dates back to the arrival of Martin Luther Banner in 1848. Tourism is the major force of its economy. Between July and October, as many as 15,000 people will come on weekends to shop, enjoy the scenery, visit the many restaurants, or attend the town's famous Wooly Worm Festival. The town's quiet allure and scenic beauty attracts second-home owners. Lees-McRae College, with a student of body of 700, has been a Banner Elk institution for over 100 years and contributes to the cultural scene by bringing novelists, musicians, and other artists to the campus.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p18-20, 22, il, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6867
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Moses Horton was the first African-American slave to voice a protest of his bondage in poetical form. Born in Northampton County, Horton, when he was around three years of age, was moved to Chatham County, where he worked his master's farm. He taught himself to read, but did not learn to write until he was an adult. Wilson discusses Horton's early attempts at composing poetry; his encounters with students at the university at Chapel Hill, for whom he composed acrostics and poems for 25 to 75 cents; his coming to the attention of novelist Caroline Hentz, who became his patron; his eventual freedom; and his books of poetry.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p42-44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6865
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has a number of well-known bed and breakfast inns. Three lodging establishments in the mountains are known not only for the amenities offered but also as places where previous occupants continue to linger on after death. The inns are the White Gate Inn and Cottage (Asheville); Lodge on Lake Lure (Lake Lure); and the Inn on Main Street (Weaverville).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p170-172, 174, 176-177, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6866
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lost Cove, four hundred acres of rocky but fertile land in the North Carolina mountains near the Tennessee border, was settled around 1861 by Morgan Bailey. It existed as a small community through the years and never totaled more than twenty families. The remote location did not prevent it from having a school, mail delivery, and services of a physician. Discontinued passenger train service and the lack of a suitable road into the community contributed to Lost Cove's demise in 1957.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p152-155, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
6868
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773, on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. Part of his travels took him through eighty-one miles of western North Carolina. Today a hiking trail marks his journey's path. Nickens retraces the naturalist's steps and records his observations.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p120-122, 124, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6914
Author(s):
Abstract:
Harley Prewitt's Apple Hill Orchard and Cider Mill in Morganton has been in the family for four generations. Each year the Prewitts harvest 2,000 trees that grow old favorites, like Red and Golden Delicious apples, and newer varieties, like Ginger Golds, Galas, and Pink Ladies. The orchard has also become a place for families to come for outings and old-fashioned fun. On Family Fun Days, held each Saturday, visitors can taste the cider, sample jams and jellies, and pick their own apples. Prewitt started giving to tours to schoolchildren in 1994, which educate the children about apple growing and local history.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p84-86, 88, 90, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6915
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fund raising for needed school items is an annual event in school systems across the country. The Bethel Elementary School, located in Bethel, a small community in Watauga County, has one of the most unique approaches. In 1999, Bob and Marilyn Prejean began selling pumpkin seeds at ten dollars a package. All the money was donated to the school. In the fall, community members would gather to see who had raised the biggest pumpkin. The winner took home bragging rights and a trophy to keep until the following fall. The winning pumpkin in 2003 weighed in at 226 pounds.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p92-94, 96, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6911
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tuberculosis had been a serious health problem in North Carolina from colonial times until the mid-20th-century. From the late 1940s to the early 1960s, trailers belonging to the Tuberculosis Control section of the North Carolina State Board of Health traveled the state offering chest X-rays to the general public. There was no charge for the service, which, by 1964, had taken X-ray pictures of around 500,000 people. Pittard discusses this preventative care program that helped to nearly eradicate tuberculosis in the state.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p24-25, 27, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6913
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jean Vollrath of Stanly weaves and teaches weaving in an 1835 log cabin on her property. Her work blends tradition with modern technology to create vibrantly colored and intricately patterned cloth. Vollrath works in this 170-year-old cabin, practicing a craft that dates back to ancient times, using looms from the early 20th-century to the present, and designing some of her cloth with computer software. Vollrath discusses the art of weaving and her creations.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p34-36, 38, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6912
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina historian, Dr. Lindley Butler, taught history at Rockingham Community College for nearly thirty years before his retirement in 1996. Butler was born in Eden and grew up on its rivers. He discusses his love of water, the state's history, and historical research. Since 1996, he has been a volunteer diver for the North Carolina Underwater Archaeology Branch.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
6918
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Bynum General Store opened for business in 1936, in the small community of Bynum in Chatham County. At one time the mill town of 250 people supported five general stores but only one survived. The Bynum store sells everything from the usual canned goods to old movie posters. It also displays old items that are not for sale but add to the store's ambiance. The store owners host a weekly event during the summer that is called the Front Porch Music Series. Now in its fourth season, the series presents all types of bands, from acoustic folk to bluegrass to alt-country.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p112-114, 116, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6921
Abstract:
The Southeast Animal Fiber Fair, in Fletcher, is the largest event of its kind held in the southeastern United States. Now in its eleventh year, the fair “strives to support local small farms, businesses, and crafters by providing a forum for educating the public about the fiber arts and fiber production.” For shoppers the fair is an opportunity to purchase hand-knit sweaters, hats, scarves, and other items and to observe demonstration booths of looms, spinning wheels, and wool dyeing.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p140-142, 144, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6919
Author(s):
Abstract:
Begun in 1965 by Marvin Johnson and his wife Mary, the Gourd Museum in Kennebec contains a unique collection of the vegetable. With some dating to 1804, the gourds represent many shapes, designs, and countries. For “gourders,” or people who grow gourds or make works of art out of them, this museum is their mecca. Mary died in 1986 and Marvin in 2002. The museum is now maintained by Marvin's nephew, Mark Johnson.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p126-129, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6923
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Flora MacDonald Highland Games, named for Scotland's most famous heroine, Flora MacDonald, celebrate Robeson County's Scottish heritagey. Highland Scots predominated in the area in the early 18th-century. The games, held on the first Saturday in October, began in 1977, and nearly 6,000 attendees watch clans celebrate their heritage with music, song, dance, and athletic competition.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p184-186, 188-189, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6917
Abstract:
Blackburn discusses the Wendell Harvest Festival, which is held in the town each year in early October. The regionally famous festival began in the early 1900s when tobacco was king in Wendell and the surrounding area. Today the festival is as much about the present as the past, celebrating the importance of tobacco and farming to Wendell's heritage as well as celebrating the present-day culture and life of the community.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p104-106, 108-109, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text: