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8 results for Pearce Brinkley Cease + Lee (Raleigh)
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Record #:
3897
Author(s):
Abstract:
African-American poetry and poets are alive and well in the Triangle area. Somewhere on any given night, poets are reading and sharing their creations. One of the most popular places to hear poetry is Durham's Poetic Soul Lounge.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 16 Issue 41, Oct 1998, p33, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6865
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has a number of well-known bed and breakfast inns. Three lodging establishments in the mountains are known not only for the amenities offered but also as places where previous occupants continue to linger on after death. The inns are the White Gate Inn and Cottage (Asheville); Lodge on Lake Lure (Lake Lure); and the Inn on Main Street (Weaverville).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p170-172, 174, 176-177, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6868
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Abstract:
William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773, on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. Part of his travels took him through eighty-one miles of western North Carolina. Today a hiking trail marks his journey's path. Nickens retraces the naturalist's steps and records his observations.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p120-122, 124, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6873
Abstract:
The Raleigh architectural firm of Pearce Brinkley Cease + Lee received the 2004 AIA North Carolina Chapter Firm Award. The award is given to the firm producing quality architecture and having a high level of customer satisfaction for a ten-year period. The firm was founded in 1945 and has been the recipient of numerous design awards. One of the firm's most acclaimed projects in the BTI Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Raleigh.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 62 Issue 10, Oct 2004, p42-43, por
Record #:
6199
Abstract:
The slave revolt led by Nat Turner in Southampton County, Virginia, in August of 1831, caused 59 white deaths and widespread destruction. Morris describes how the citizens of North Carolina reacted when the news reached them and how the revolt affected slaves at the time and in the ensuing years.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 20 Issue 2, Winter 1981, p29-31, il, por, bibl
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Record #:
1153
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Abstract:
The NC William Bartram Trail memorializes the journeys of William Bartram, a Philadelphia naturalist/botanist who traveled Western NC on botanical expeditions and recorded his favorable impressions of the area.
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Record #:
3058
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The N.C. Bartram Society, named for naturalist William Bartram, has been building the Bartram Trail, a 70-mile hiking trail in western Carolina, for the last eighteen years. Completion is scheduled for the fall of 1997.
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Record #:
4588
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist, John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773 on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. The newly-opened, 81-mile Bartram Trail follows his path through the wilds of western North Carolina. Nickens describes his experiences hiking in Bartram's 200-year-old footsteps.
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