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14 results for Bartram, William, 1739-1823
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Record #:
4061
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Abstract:
William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist, John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773, on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. When he returned in 1777, he had categorized over 100 plants and 215 birds and had written an incomparable travel epic. The University of Georgia Press has recently reissued the narrative.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Winter 1999, p8-9, il
Record #:
6868
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773, on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. Part of his travels took him through eighty-one miles of western North Carolina. Today a hiking trail marks his journey's path. Nickens retraces the naturalist's steps and records his observations.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p120-122, 124, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9623
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Natural William Bartram began keeping notebooks on the natural history of the Blue Ridge and Smoky Mountains in 1775. Because of strained relations with North Carolina Indian tribes, he did his work alone and without the help of a guide. Eventually he reached the Cherokee Middle Towns near present-day Franklin in Macon County, where he was welcomed. It is from this point that his journal details descriptions of the Cherokee. His journals, first published in 1791, describe the earliest days of North Carolina and also provide an ethnology of the Indians.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 11, Apr 1977, p21-22, il, map
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Record #:
12863
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The visit of William Bartram in 1776 to Western North Carolina was recorded in his book, Travels. In the seventh installment of his diary offered by The State, Bartram's travels within the state are concluded.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 14, Dec 1959, p14, 25, il
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Record #:
12888
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The visit of William Bartram in 1776 to Western North Carolina was recorded in his book, Travels. In this installment, The State picks up Bartram as he passed from Georgia to North Carolina, via the valley of the Little Tennessee, currently known as Macon County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 7, Sept 1959, p17-18, map
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Record #:
12898
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The visit of William Bartram in 1776 to Western North Carolina was recorded in his book, TRAVELS. In the fourth installment of his diary offered by The State, this article covers Bartram's encounter with the sylvan scene while botanizing in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 11, Oct 1959, p10, 43, il
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Record #:
14517
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Ashwood, the home of the Bartrams, stands unnoticed by many people on their way to Wilmington, and yet its story and the story of the people who built it are interesting ones.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 10, Aug 1945, p20-21
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Record #:
22355
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William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773, on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. Part of his travels took him through seventy-four miles of western North Carolina. He is considered the father of American botany. Today his route is maintained by the NC Bartram Trail Society.
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Record #:
24024
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The author traces various artistic interpretations of Western North Carolina's landscapes since the 18th century, focusing primarily on William Bartram, who traveled throughout the area in 1775. The painter and botanist observed customs and traditions of the Cherokee, publishing his accounts as 'Travels' in 1791.
Record #:
24589
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The world famous Bartram family from Philadelphia had four ‘Williams’ in all, some of whom made their home in North Carolina. This article discusses the history and impact of the Bartram family in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 14, December 1971, p11-12, il, por
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Record #:
1153
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The NC William Bartram Trail memorializes the journeys of William Bartram, a Philadelphia naturalist/botanist who traveled Western NC on botanical expeditions and recorded his favorable impressions of the area.
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Record #:
2892
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John Bartram, botanist to King George III, and his son William, were eminent naturalists who traveled the Carolinas and the Southeast collecting botanical specimens. William's 1791 book, TRAVELS, is considered a landmark of early botanical study.
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Record #:
4588
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Abstract:
William Bartram, son of the famous royal botanist, John Bartram, left Philadelphia in 1773 on a four-year botanizing expedition across the Southeast. The newly-opened, 81-mile Bartram Trail follows his path through the wilds of western North Carolina. Nickens describes his experiences hiking in Bartram's 200-year-old footsteps.
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Record #:
36483
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For European explorers, natural historians, and botanists traversing the territory now known as North America, nature walks had at least two purposes. They were commissioned to find herbs to take back to the Old World and become familiar with the land their host countries intended to colonize. Naturalist William Bartram’s journey covered the Appalachian Mountains to Florida, as well as throughout the southeast to the Mississippi River. His chronicles, published collectively as Bartram’s Travels, may serve as an apt guide for those following the trail memorializing his journey. Within are a wealth of specimens, drawings, and observations about the people and landscape he encountered between 1773-1777.