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5 results for Horton, George Moses, 1797-1883
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Record #:
6867
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Abstract:
George Moses Horton was the first African-American slave to voice a protest of his bondage in poetical form. Born in Northampton County, Horton, when he was around three years of age, was moved to Chatham County, where he worked his master's farm. He taught himself to read, but did not learn to write until he was an adult. Wilson discusses Horton's early attempts at composing poetry; his encounters with students at the university at Chapel Hill, for whom he composed acrostics and poems for 25 to 75 cents; his coming to the attention of novelist Caroline Hentz, who became his patron; his eventual freedom; and his books of poetry.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p42-44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
14624
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Despite the fact that comparatively few people today have ever heard of him, George Moses Horton, a slave, was one of the most remarkable literary figures North Carolina has ever known.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 50, May 1946, p8
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Record #:
21295
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George Moses Horton was an early slave poet who lived near Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Horton wrote several poetry books and earned enough to support himself and satisfy his master. After the Civil War Horton moved to Philadelphia where he died in anonymity.
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Record #:
16092
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From emancipation to the Civil Rights, the African American movement for equality was led by exceptional individuals. Highlighted are the lives of some of the most influential including; George Moses Horton, John Chavis, Henry Evans, and Lunsford Lane.
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Record #:
38025
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Moses Horton, born abt. 1797 a slave in Northampton Co., NC, taught himself to read and write. About age 19, he made regular trips to UNC-Chapel Hill where he was encouraged and his poetic ability was discovered. A student paid him for a poem and he became one of the first African-American writers in the south. For the remainder of his life he supported himself, partially and at time totally from the fees he collected from his poems. By the 1830’s, Horton’s works were appearing in the ‘Raleigh Register,’ and went on to publish several books with backing from white friends.