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14 results for Our State Vol. 67 Issue 12, May 2000
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Record #:
4556
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In November 1775, Lord Dunmore, Virginia's last Royal Governor, planned to invade North Carolina. Capturing Portsmouth and Norfolk, he next barricaded Great Bridge on the Carolina side, blocking all shipments to the Norfolk port. A small force of Americans marched on Great Bridge. Knowing the force was outnumbered, Betsy Dowdy from Currituck Banks rode her horse Black Bess fifty miles on the night of December 10, 1775, to alert General William Skinner and his men at Hertford. Skinner's force reached Great Bridge in time to help defeat Dunmore on December 11, 1775, and end the invasion threat.
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4561
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In 1890, the U.S. Government awarded experienced marine contractors Anderson & Barr of New Jersey a contract to build a lighthouse on Diamond Shoals, nine miles off Cape Hatteras. The Shoals, an area of strong undersea currents and shifting sands, has doomed many a ship and mariner. It was more than a match for the contractors, despite their heroic efforts. Unable to keep the lighthouse base level because of shifting sands, the workforce withdrew on July 4, 1891, in the face of a hurricane which destroyed the remains of the lighthouse.
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4559
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Lying between Southport and Bald Head Island on the east bank of the Cape Fear River, Battery Island is sanctuary for thousands of wading birds. In 1982, it became part of Audubon North Carolina Coastal Island Sanctuary. It is the state's largest heronry, with upwards of 10,000 pairs. Among the species nesting there are 12 percent of the world's white ibises, great egrets, cattle egrets, and black-crowned night herons.
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4563
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With tourism increasing on the Outer Banks, developers began hotel construction. The Nags Header Hotel, a three-story oceanfront structure built at Milepost 11 for $20,000, opened in May 1935. It was billed as the Carolina coast's finest hotel. Amenities included a bath in every room with hot and cold running water. The hotel burned to the ground October 28, 1978. The author's grandfather, George C. Culpepper, Sr., owned the hotel from 1944 to 1970.
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4558
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Between 1874 and 1875, Nathaniel Bishop sailed 2,500 miles in nine months, from the St. Lawrence River to the Gulf of Mexico, in a 58-pound paper canoe he called Maria Theresa. As he sailed down the Outer Banks, barely ten years after the end of the Civil War, he chronicled the life of the people there.
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Record #:
4562
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Today the Outer Banks are a tourist magnet. However, in the early 1920s, tourists weren't interested because the area lacked bridges, good roads, places to eat and sleep, and interesting activities. What the Outer Banks did have were visionaries like Washington Baum and Frank Stick, who pushed for these things, and Aycock Brown, first director of the Dare County Tourist Bureau, who put the Outer Banks on the map with his endless publicity.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 12, May 2000, p74-79, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
4560
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While many people know the state's seven famous coastal lighthouses, few know that in the 19th-century North Carolina had dozens of sound and river lighthouses. Standing twelve feet above the water, these two-story, four-sided structures of a 1,000 square feet functioned like today's highway markers. The lighthouses at Croatan River, Roanoke Marshes River, Long Shoal River, Neuse River, Roanoke River, and Pamlico Point are profiled.
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Record #:
4557
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North Carolina's seven lighthouses - Currituck Beach, Bodie Island, Cape Hatteras, Ocracoke, Cape Lookout, Bald Head, and Oak Island - are profiled.
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4564
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Rowan County in the 1700s was a junction of two major roads: the Great Pennsylvania Wagon Road and the Warrior's Trading Path. Records of who passed through, who settled, then moved on, were stored in the courthouse at Salisbury. Through the single-handed efforts of Mary Elizabeth Gaskill McCubbins, who amassed over 150,000 pieces of genealogical information, the records were made more accessible to the public. Today the Rowan Public Library's genealogical section, with 4,000 microfilms, 20,000 books, and the McCubbins' Collection, is one of the nation's top genealogical research libraries.
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Record #:
4565
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Men dominated photography in the 19th-century. It was felt the demands of the profession, such as developing, chemical knowledge, and cumbersome equipment, were too arduous for women who were mostly assistants. A few women persisted, including Malvina Ramsour in Lincoln County, Kate Johnson in Durham, and Mrs. H.H. Davisson in Oxford. It was at the beginning of the 20th-century that women began to step behind the camera. The premier woman photographer of this period in North Carolina was Bayard Wootten.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 12, May 2000, p88-92, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
4567
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Angela Peterson collected her first doll in 1909. Her name was Rosie. Today the Angela Peterson Doll & Miniature Museum in High Point houses over 1,700 dolls from 40 countries and doll houses and miniatures. The museum is the largest of its kind in the Southeast. Included in the collection are crèche dolls dating to the year 1450 and one of the world's largest collections of Shirley Temple dolls, 130.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 12, May 2000, p109-112, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4568
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Located on Queen Street in historic Beaufort, the Beaufort Grocery Company is one of the best restaurants for fine dining on the coast. Owned by Charles and Wendy Park, the eleven-year-old establishment features a variety of dishes from Indo-Asian to down-home Carolina. Casual elegance and fine food attract locals and tourists alike.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 12, May 2000, p132-134, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4566
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North Carolina is a sailor's paradise. Inland lakes, sounds, Intracoastal Waterway, and the Atlantic provide all types of sailing experiences. Novice sailors and master mariners can also hone their skills at a number of sailing schools, including the Water Ways Sailing School at Wrightsville Beach.
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Record #:
4581
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Known as Company Shops until the railroads left in 1886, the town changed its name to Burlington. The economy next depended on textiles with the Glencoe Mill, 1880-1954, and Burlington Industries since 1923. Family businesses are old, some dating back to 1910. The nostalgic can find historic sites, including a 1910 carousal. The town is also home to Elon College. Burlington experienced a 12 percent population growth in the 1990s to 44,000; location between the Research Triangle and the Piedmont Triad was a contributing factor.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 12, May 2000, p16-18, 20-22, il Periodical Website
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