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9 results for Our State Vol. 67 Issue 10, Mar 2000
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Record #:
4475
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The names of Dr. William Sharpe, Gertrude Hurst, and John Hurst are bound to Hammocks Beach State Park's history. Sharpe bought the land in 1914, and Hurst, an Afro-American outdoorsman, managed it for over forty years. Sharpe planned to will the Hursts the property, but they knew they lacked funds to develop it. At their suggestion, Sharpe gave it to the North Carolina Teachers Association, an African American teachers' organization. In 1961, association gave it to the state for a park.
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4481
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James Carthine English was born in McDowell County in 1838. In 1862, he joined the Confederate Army and went off to fight in North Carolina and Virginia. On May 16th, 1864, he was mortally wounded near Richmond. He wrote his family over 150 letters which were preserved and handed down through the generations, a cherished legacy of a devoted husband and father.
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4480
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The Battle of Bentonville in Johnston County, fought in the spring of 1865, was the last great battle of the Civil War and the largest ever fought in North Carolina. On March 18-19, 2000, around 3,500 reenactors with twenty artillery pieces will recreate parts of the battle in observance of its 135th anniversary.
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4489
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Fearing that Federal troops would capture the Fresnel lens in the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Confederate soldiers removed it and shipped it inland to Washington, then Tarboro. With the Union threatening destruction of Washington if the lens wasn't returned, Dr. David Tayloe assumed responsibility for the lens and carried it to safety by boxcar to his home in Townsville in what is now Vance County. Tayloe died in 1884. The whereabouts of the forty-five boxes containing the Fresnel lens remain a mystery to this day.
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4487
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Gutted by fire in 1985, the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church in Charlotte has risen from the ashes in a new guise - the Tryon Center for Visual Art. Restored through a $7 million grant from Bank of America, the center provides three-month grants and work space to national and international artists. It is also a place where young and old can take classes, artists can exhibit, and local artists can lease space for a small fee.
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4485
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Eastern North Carolina could have been a major battleground of the Civil War. It was close to the Confederate capital in Richmond. The area possessed valuable resources, and many citizens supported the Union cause. Yet Northern war strategy bypassed the region, except for the capture of Roanoke Island and New Bern in 1862. It would be late 1864 before the Union recognized the area's value and moved to capture it.
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4486
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Over 50,000 individuals in North Carolina and around the world participate in recreating the Civil War period with historical accuracy in dress and battles. The participants are drawn to reenacting through a love of history, the chance to play on opposing sides to gain the opponent's perspective, camaraderie, family participation, and the spiritual aspect of being where family members fought or died.
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4490
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At the Wilmington airport on February 20, 1948, Piedmont Airlines founder Tom Davis watched the first flight of his fledgling airline take off. Davis was almost 30, and his airline consisted of three used DC-3 airplanes and 250 employees. Forty years later Piedmont was one of the nation's largest airlines before its acquisition and merger with USAir in the late 1980s.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 10, Mar 2000, p70-71, 74-75, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4488
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An unknown woman's photograph on his father's desk and an 1849 letter written by slave owner and buyer A. A. Pattillo, found in his deceased father's papers, led Frank Woods on a journey of discovery. His search determined that the woman in the photograph was his great-grandmother. Woods also learned the name of her mother and found proof that he is a descendant of slaves.
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