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8 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 9 Issue 1, July 1961
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Record #:
16500
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Abstract:
There is probably no oral literature in America as varied and as localized as that of the African American. Although it is stemmed from a common African heritage, foreign cultures and indigenous traditions have wielded a powerful influence on the African American's comment on his American existence. This is especially true of that phase of lore labeled folk narrative, which although retaining certain communal traits and characteristics of its aboriginal background, has nevertheless been strongly flavored by American regional factors. It is not surprising then that the North Carolina African American's stock of oral narratives should vary to some extent from those in other sections of the South.
Record #:
35175
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Abstract:
Two humorous stories from the Low Country of the Carolinas, one about two competing fisherwomen, and the other about a rabbi who accidentally got baptized.
Record #:
35172
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A short anecdote about a deacon who falls asleep during one session, and wakes up during another and accidentally advocates for the continuation of prostitution.
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Record #:
35174
Author(s):
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A story made up by the author in eighth grade, explaining why sometimes the moon does not show itself, on account of it being shot up by competing marksmen.
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Record #:
35173
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several pages of common riddles and their variations that had been collected from students in North Carolina State College.
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Record #:
35171
Abstract:
The Native American lore commonly known as “Lover’s Leap,” takes a more local spin which centers on a young Cherokee woman, Lucy, who drowned herself in a pond when the object of her admiration did not reciprocate her feelings.
Record #:
35170
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author seeks to re-evaluate the similarities between British and American folksongs, past the already established knowledge of medieval modes. A brief overview of terms and folksong styles are recounted, and then points of contention within past interpretations are acknowledged.
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