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9 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 51 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2004
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Record #:
7294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hurricane Isabel did more than flood and destroy homes in the Down East section of North Carolina in 2003. It wreaked havoc upon family heirlooms and community treasures, including family Bibles, photo albums, musical instruments, and ancient quilts. While volunteers from across the state responded to the community needs of food, water and shelter, Vogel called in a team of conservators from the National Park Service Harpers Ferry Center Conservation Lab to evaluate, restore, and repair family treasures. Vogel received the award for “his leadership and example in the rescue of artifacts of Down East culture in the aftermath of Hurricane Isabel, and for his dedication to preserving, appreciating, and celebrating the human accomplishments of our traditional maritime communities.”
Record #:
7291
Author(s):
Abstract:
Connie Mason has been on the staff of the North Carolina Maritime Museum for fifteen years as a curator of history. Her numerous responsibilities include folklorist, historian, musician, songwriter, and the producer of folklife programs, such as Traditional Trades and Pastimes and Coastal Folkways Day. She was nominated for a Brown-Hudson Award by the Maritime Museum and the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum. She received the award “for her generous and imaginative efforts in collecting, interpreting, and exhibiting Down East folklife for the people of North Carolina.”
Record #:
7293
Abstract:
On May 3, 2004, President and Mrs. George W. Bush presented the Preserve America Presidential Award to the staff of the North Carolina Arts Council. The award recognizes agencies, non-profit organizations, and individuals in the Appalachian region of North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, and Georgia who collaborated on a project called the Blue Ridge Heritage Initiative. Since 1996, those involved in the project have worked to develop heritage tourism as a way of preserving the region's cultural traditions.
Record #:
7290
Author(s):
Abstract:
Earl and Max Carawan are third generation musicians from rural Hyde County. Rufus Carawan, their grandfather, encouraged all his family members to learn to play the banjo, fiddle, and guitar for square dances and local gatherings. For years the brothers played old-time music, bluegrass, and early country music. They received a 2004 Brown-Hudson award for traditional artists for continuing a musical legacy in their part of the state.
Record #:
7292
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Folklore Society's Community Traditions Award is given to organizations and individuals that make valuable contributions to the state's folklife. Karen Willis Amspacher received the award in 2004 for her publication, THE MAILBOAT, that takes its name from Down East mailboats which brought freight, produce, mail, news, and visiting friends to coastal and island communities in the 19th- and early 20th-centuries.
Record #:
36399
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ulrich Mack spent time in 1985 photographing people on Harkers Island, NC, which he returned to once his photos were developed. He made the photos into a book, Inselmenschen.
Record #:
36397
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Abstract:
The author recalls her time living in Ireland, at the height of her love interest for Irish folk music.
Record #:
36408
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ralph Lewis was an amateur folk musician and his sons, Marty and Don, formed a band featuring their father. Their music is high-energy and based on a family-based collaboration of bluegrass tradition passed between two generations of the Lewis family.