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5 results for Heritage tourism
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Record #:
7293
Abstract:
On May 3, 2004, President and Mrs. George W. Bush presented the Preserve America Presidential Award to the staff of the North Carolina Arts Council. The award recognizes agencies, non-profit organizations, and individuals in the Appalachian region of North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee, and Georgia who collaborated on a project called the Blue Ridge Heritage Initiative. Since 1996, those involved in the project have worked to develop heritage tourism as a way of preserving the region's cultural traditions.
Record #:
7828
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Abstract:
Heritage tourism, or visiting an area for cultural and natural enrichment, is one of the fastest growing segments of the state's second largest industry, tourism. Using the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area as an example, Wright discusses what is involved in securing a heritage designation. The Blue Ridge area covers twenty-five western North Carolina counties. Other heritage initiatives include ecotourism, such as the North Carolina Birding Trail, and a movement to save the rapidly disappearing heritage of the Southern mill towns, the Southwide Textile Heritage Initiative.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 5, May 2006, p16, 18-19, 22-23, il
Record #:
8493
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is one of the top ten states for cultural and heritage tourism. These tourists are interested in visiting historic sites and museums, attending concerts, shopping at farmers markets, and dining at the restaurants where the local people eat. Much of the state's heritage is found along a series of sixteen trails, such as the Art Road and Farmers Trail. The North Carolina Department of Commerce has twelve heritage tourism officers who help communities along the trails in highlighting material that is appropriate to their particular region. Pittard discusses a number of the trails and what they provide to the tourists.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 8, Jan 2007, p68-70, 72, 74-75, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15982
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Abstract:
Culinary tourism is becoming a popular industry in Southern Appalachia, an area long thought to be a place of hearty, primitive fare. The culinary hub is Asheville where foodies sample cuisine rooted in history and culture. Farmers markets, updated dishes, and diverse offerings celebrate Asheville's natural beauty and new cultural diversity.
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Record #:
16954
Abstract:
Antiques tourism is a form of heritage tourism, wherein people travel in pursuit of antiques, or stop to shop for antiques during a trip for another purpose. It is an increasingly popular development strategy for cities and towns across North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 11 Issue , 2003, p74-87, map, bibl
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