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7 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 29 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 1981
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Record #:
16318
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the use of a seemingly undecipherable scrap of paper, weavers at the Hezekiah Alexander Homesite (of the Mint Museum of History, Charlotte, NC) have discovered a \"new\" historic coverlet pattern.
Record #:
16320
Author(s):
Abstract:
Devil's Shoe String is the popular name for a plant growing in the eastern United States. It was believed to provide a cure for the poisonous bite of a rattlesnake when boiled in sweet milk and applied as a poultice.
Record #:
35823
Author(s):
Abstract:
Root doctors, also known as conjurers, were often hired out by people who are to appear in court. A root worker does not prove guilt or innocence, but works to influence the persons involved in the care, including the witnesses, judge, and jury. Root doctors usually relied upon either rituals and powders, spells, roots, the evil eye, or earth to assist them.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35826
Author(s):
Abstract:
Learning part of a song when he was a boy, the author strove to find the full song when he finished high school. As the tale goes, Johnny Sands and Patty Haig married after happening upon a pot of buried treasure. Wanting the gold for herself, Patty Haig attempted to kill Johnny, but ended up dying herself.
Record #:
35824
Author(s):
Abstract:
Madstones were thought to cure bites from animals, such as snakes or dogs. Five instances of a madstone being used are copied here.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35825
Author(s):
Abstract:
Known as a folk legend in the Southern Appalachia region, two tales regarding Daniel Boone are recorded here.