NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 12 Issue 2, Dec 1964
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
16484
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1929 workers at the Loray Mills in Gastonia, North Carolina walked out on strike. In retaliation, the mill owners evicted strikers from the mill villages and cut off their credit to the company store. Tent colonies sprang up, armed strikers stalked the streets, and violence spread.
Record #:
16482
Author(s):
Abstract:
When folksongs are collected they may be classified by two approaches, the typological and the genetic-historical. The typological approach classifies the tunes through their internal characteristics, while the genetic-historical approach classifies them into groups of melodies which are either related in origin or are similar although not actually related.
Subject(s):
Record #:
16481
Author(s):
Abstract:
There remains a vital body of material yet to be explored, more alive today than ballad-singing or any other oral folk art. That extensive body is the instrumental tradition of fiddle, dulcimer, and five-string banjo music.
Subject(s):
Record #:
16483
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the introduction of the potato into Great Britain and the \"Potato Scare\" of World War One, this new-world plant made history challenged for its novelty only by the history of tobacco. Either fact or fiction associated with potatoes is, in itself, a fascinating chapter in modern history.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35249
Abstract:
An African American woman told this story to Mrs. Johnson about a mule that was blind in the time after the Civil War and persevered, and the story teller drew some parallels to racism in their current life in 1955 in Mississippi.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35252
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is the analysis of symbolism and folklore in the novel “The Track of the Cat.” The novel contains elements of animal symbolism, good versus evil, fear of the unknown, gender stereotypes, and death.
Record #:
35251
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the request to know if the term “Sandlapper” was suitable for a magazine title, the author presents the origin, meaning, and any stigmas attached to the word.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35253
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is a book review of “Anglo-Saxon Riddles of the Exeter Book.”
Subject(s):