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10 results for New East Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973
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Record #:
5837
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village of Portsmouth, located on North Core Banks, was founded in 1753 and was once a bustling fishing village. Today it is empty - a village of deserted buildings and no residents. White describes life in the village as it used to be.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p12-15, 29, il
Record #:
5862
Author(s):
Abstract:
Columbus County, formed in 1808 from parts of neighboring counties, is NEW EAST magazine's featured county of the month. Thompson discusses the history of the county and current economic conditions.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p22, 32-33, 35-36, il
Record #:
35555
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Core Sound was a village that might be rightly called a ghost town. Not a single living inhabitant resides there, as anyone who visits by ferry, beach buggy, or air can attest. In fact, only two things remained in a town the author proclaimed held promise upon its founding in 1753. One is the physical reminders of lifeways gone by, like an enclave of houses and outbuildings maintained by the owners’ descendants. Another was memories of life in a town that started its long, gradual decline by the early nineteenth century.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p12-15, 29
Record #:
35557
Author(s):
Abstract:
The need for electricity was pressing—twofold more every seven years for rapidly growing areas. The problems contributing to the crisis: shortage of fossil fuels and residents’ reluctance to have electric generating station in their backyard. Westinghouse Electric Company, coupled with Offshore Power Systems, proved the crisis could be averted, the problems were not insurmountable. Their solution for anyone seeking an alternative fuel source and/or not wanting generating stations within sight: nuclear power plants offshore.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p18-19, 42-44
Record #:
35559
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author’s visit to this county, founded in 1803 and from parts of Bladen and Brunswick counties, revealed its value. Value was defined earlier by its lumber companies and railroads, later by bright leaf tobacco and strawberries. How it maintained value, despite the post WWII mass migration of its youth? That was through factors it had in common with its neighboring counties. There were still beaches and fishing grounds. There was still a community of citizens and civic organizations willing to welcome newcomers.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p22, 32-33, 35-36
Record #:
35556
Author(s):
Abstract:
As a companion article to “Portsmouth Island Stands in the Backwash of Time” was a profile of the last permanent resident of the Core Sound town. Profiled was Henry Piggott, resident during the sum of his seventy four years and now resident of the family cemetery. Profiled also was the small pink house in which Piggott resided. The dwelling held remnants of lifeways gone by, such as the kitchen and bathroom as separate buildings.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p16-17
Record #:
35558
Author(s):
Abstract:
The craft was wood carving, the objects fashioned duck decoys. For John Sawyer, what started as a hobby grew into what the author called a second occupation. It was a necessary joint business-like venture; John, color blind, left the painting of the decoys to Clara. How it proved to be business like, more hobby than occupation, was proven in their devotion to detail.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p20-21, 38-39
Record #:
35561
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village in need of fresh water was Ocracoke. How this need was met for the almost four hundred year old town contained an irony. Desalinization entailed removing the saline from the water that surrounded them: the sea.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p40-41, 45
Record #:
35560
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the director of Dare County Tourist Bureau, Aycock Brown proved to be a memorable figure in ways that went beyond his Panama hat and ever present cameras. The best way, though, was a question from strangers directed to denizens: “do you know Aycock Brown”?
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p30
Record #:
35562
Author(s):
Abstract:
Corporations like McDonalds were moving from small towns and cities alike a staple of a time gone by: mom and pop restaurants. Then came the Shakedown, leaving many franchise owners unable to keep open what was commonly a side business. The Shakedown was defined by money—lots of it. Hardees, with an alternative recipe for success—relying on corporations, not moms and pops, for franchisees—weathered the Shakedown storm.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p46-47, 36-37