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4 results for Journal of the New Bern Historical Society Vol. 1 Issue 2, Nov 1988
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Record #:
3188
Abstract:
Although remembered for killing Richard Dobbs Spaight in the state's most famous duel in 1802, John Stanley had a distinguished career in politics. Elected in 1801 to the U.S. House of Representatives, he was speaker when felled by a stroke in 1827.
Source:
Record #:
36126
Abstract:
This exploration of the prominent family spotlighted Samuel Chapman, whose daughter Caroline contributed to the construction of the Attmore-Oliver House. An examination of his life included positions such as clerk of the County’s Superior Court, secretary of New Bern Academy’s board of trustees, and senior warden of St. John’s Lodge, number 2. Chapman’s life was also reflected in his will, in which he also left his mother, wife Catherine, and son Henry his worldly goods. As for his slave woman Juliet’s son, possibly being Chapman’s son would explain Nathan’s emancipation and share of the family fortune.
Record #:
36127
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among New Bern’s founding fathers were Baron Christopher deGraffenried, also known as Baron Christopher von Graffenried. His prominent place in the town’s history could be justified by founding the regarded center of the town and its Colonial life: a church. Though not be regarded the center any longer, the church still held an important place. That may be defined by its tombstones’ names, reflected in contemporary families, and mirrored in its architecture, a timely reflection.
Record #:
36125
Author(s):
Abstract:
Craven County’s seat can count as part of its illustrious history: becoming the state capital in 1767 and site for the Governor’s new home that year. Even if it played such a role for only twenty-seven years, assured was its permanent place in New Bern’s history, as Tryon Palace.