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12 results for Indy Week Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015
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27041
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The Durham News’ resident whitesplainer, Bob Wilson, finally called it quits. Wilson had reasonable moments during his tenure, but when he addressed race relations, he served as a reminder of systems and stereotypes that are best left behind. In response to Black Lives Matter protestors, he argued that African-Americans simply needed to stop shooting one another.
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27040
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INDY’s editor in chief, Jeffrey Billman, reflects on his observations about the Triangle since he arrived in January. He learned that North Carolina is spread out, has numerous festivals and fairs, a plethora of hiking trails, a great Greenway system, and unpredictable weather. Raleigh is a huge small town trying to become a big city and it’s expensive, but the people are unnervingly nice.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p5-6, il Periodical Website
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27042
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The Triangle’s biggest stories of 2015 include the debate over Raleigh’s sidewalk-drinking restrictions, Governor McCrory’s prison scandal, bills against the environment and same-sex marriage, the Chapel Hill shootings, and affordable housing. On a positive note, Durham Police Chief Jose Lopez was forced out, Duke Basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski secured his 1,000th win and a national championship, and Raleigh acquired property for Dix Park.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p8-11, il Periodical Website
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27044
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The Triangle’s food community continues to thrive and expand, as does its national acclaim. Buying and eating locally is becoming easier as farmers markets and food trucks continue to pop up, and organic food education spreads. Craft breweries and cold-press juice bars have also infiltrated the Triangle.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p14-16, il Periodical Website
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27048
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There were changes aplenty this year, as artists came and went and innovated when faced with challenges old and new. New groups and artists flourished in the Triangle, and local artists made waves in New York productions. Triangle theaters premiered plays addressing race, leadership changed at PlayMakers Repertory Company, and Deep Dish Theater Company closed.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p23, por Periodical Website
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27043
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Despite dismal events, 2015 was a year for restoring hope that the future will be better. The year saw real headway at the presidential-election level thanks to Bernie Sanders, and there is more effort to address climate change. Raleigh has pledged to get serious about affordable housing and Wake County proposed a high-quality bus transit using a half-cent sales tax.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p13 Periodical Website
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27046
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This year, people from the Triangle got their fifteen seconds of social media fame. One of the most delightful viral videos was a clip of six-year-old Raleigh native Johanna Colon dancing to Aretha Franklin’s song Respect. Other viral videos were of a plane breakup, swim team stuck at Raleigh-Durham Airport, Durham Academy a cappella group XIV Hours, and the Muslim student murders near Chapel Hill.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p21, por Periodical Website
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27049
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The Triangle visual art scene continued its modernization of recent years in 2015, with the emergence of new art spaces, museum renovations and large-scale construction projects. Noteworthy shows this year include art by Chris Watts, Bill Thelen with Jason Polan, Susan Harbage Page and Rachel Meginnes.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p25, por Periodical Website
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27047
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Notable comedy acts in the Triangle this year were feminist comedy, the monthly Bulltown Comedy Series held at Fullsteam brewery, and the fifteenth anniversary of the North Carolina Comedy Arts Festival. Local comedians earned national notices and Raleigh’s Adam Cohen launched Band Candy, a YouTube channel featuring animated shorts voiced by local comedians.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p22, por Periodical Website
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27050
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The Triangle region’s most active, close-knit writing scene produced a variety of good books this year. Among the top ten books include a new novel by Asheville’s Nathan Ballingrud, and works of nonfiction, memoirs, and short stories written by authors from Chapel Hill, Herford, and Charlotte, North Carolina.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p26, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27045
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Each year, INDY compiles a list of favorite local LPs and Eps. Among the twenty-five best albums of 2015 are music by Phil Cook, Sarah Shook & The Disarmers, Earthly, Boulevards, Des Ark, and See Gulls.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p17-20, il Periodical Website
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27051
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Recognizing the devastation wrought on North Carolina’s film industry, the General Assembly increased grant funding for the 2015-2016 fiscal year. The boutique movie theater movement finally reached the Triangle with three new so-called luxury theaters opening. Local filmmakers and festivals also had a successful year.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p26, il Periodical Website
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