NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


4 results for Independent Weekly Vol. 27 Issue 32, July 2010
Currently viewing results 1 - 4
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
27984
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state is debating their position on woody biomass. Wood is considered a renewable resource, but only if policies are in place to prevent clear-cutting. Studies show that burning wood for energy releases more greenhouse gases than coal, but the North Carolina Forestry Association and others still support burning wood. The environmental and health effects of cutting down trees to use for fuel are explored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 32, July 2010, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
27983
Author(s):
Abstract:
New studies show North Carolina has more potential to produce renewable energy than the state is planning to use. With the decreasing cost of solar power and the advancements in energy technology, the state should make use of the technology and readjust its energy goals. Statistics and graphs detail the potential the state has to increase its use of solar power, wind power, biofuels, and hydroelectric over the next few years to become a leader in the Southeast.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 32, July 2010, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
27998
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new wastewater treatment plant that will serve Cary, Apex, Morrisville, and Holly Springs will be built in New Hill near the town’s historic district. Many of the residents of New Hill won’t be able to use the plant and will have to continue to run on septic systems. The town of New Hill is primarily African-American and the residents closest the plant are majority retirees and elderly. Residents of New Hill express their frustration and discuss their battle against the construction of the plant.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 32, July 2010, p14-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
27999
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history and cultural importance of the North Carolina Gay & Lesbian Film Festival are detailed. The festival started in 1995 with controversy with people afraid of what was being shown in the films. Now, around 100 films are shown each year and is one of the largest film festivals for the LGBT community.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 32, July 2010, p30 Periodical Website