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8 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue , Winter 2000
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Record #:
4454
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1801, ship's master and Revolutionary War hero, Captain Robert Richard Randell, bequeathed his 21-acre Manhattan estate to a perpetual trust for a home for retired and disabled sailors. The home, Sailors' Snug Harbor, remained in Staten Island until 1976, when it relocated to Carteret County. The 100,000-square-foot facility employs over one hundred and provides care, activities, and housing for men and women mariners. The retirement home is located on Nelson's Bay in Sea Level.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2000, p18-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4452
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chicamacomico was one of the most famous lifesaving stations on the Outer Banks. Restored, the building opened as a museum in 1982. Now a second building on the property, built in 1874, is under restoration. Mosher chronicles the restoration, which is being done true to the original style of construction.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2000, p12-17, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4450
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are around one million crab pots in state waters. Each year, through storms, boat props, and other mishaps, 10 percent break loose. Unfortunately, the pots continue catching blue crabs. Between eleven and twenty-five blue crabs die in each loose pot per season, a significant loss to the industry. In 1994, Irene Hooker began work on a crab pot with strings that dissolve after a season. Her work will ultimately cut blue crab losses from loose crab pots.
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Record #:
4453
Abstract:
Twenty years ago, there were 14 red wolves left in the nation. Through wildlife management, this endangered animal was brought back. In 1987, red wolves were successfully released into the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in eastern North Carolina. Now, with the spread of coyotes across the state, interbreeding, which almost destroyed the red wolf's genetic purity once before, threatens it again.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2000, p22-24, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4451
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's oyster industry has declined since the start of the 20th-century, dropping from an annual harvest of two million bushels to 44,613 bushels in 1998. Over-harvesting, harvesting methods, and a natural occurring parasite are contributors to the decline. Recommendations to alleviate the oyster crisis include aquaculture, improving the quality of coastal waters, and developing disease resistant strains.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2000, p6-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4449
Author(s):
Abstract:
Frank and Rachael Thomas, retired North Carolina State University faculty members, were honored with a scholarship, the Frank Bancroft and Rachael Kirby (Kinlaw) Thomas Food Science and Family and Consumer Scholarship. The undergraduate grant will assist students studying food science and nutrition, with priority given to those studying seafood and freshwater fisheries.
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Record #:
4448
Author(s):
Abstract:
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Center for Coastal Fisheries and Marine Habitat Research at Beaufort, known as NOAA's Beaufort Laboratory, is marking its one hundredth year of service. It is the nation's second oldest marine research laboratory.
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Record #:
4455
Author(s):
Abstract:
JoAnne Powell is education curator at the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort. Powell has been at the museum since 1975 and is an enthusiastic communicator of knowledge of coastal marine and plant life.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2000, p25-26, il Periodical Website