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5 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue , Spring 2006
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Record #:
7722
Author(s):
Abstract:
The population of North Carolina will increase to twelve million in 2030. While growth has economic benefits, it can also be costly in terms of degraded land, water, and air quality. In 2000, the NC General Assembly mandated that a million acres of farmland, open space, and other conservation lands would be permanently protected by 2009. In 2002, the NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources created 'One North Carolina Naturally,' to promote and coordinate long-term programs and strategies to protect land and water resources. Smith discusses the program's goals and on-the-ground results in coastal preservation and restoration projects.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7723
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Dismal Swamp Canal is the oldest continuously operating manmade canal in the country. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is designated as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The canal is also part of the National Underground Railroad Network, an escape route for slaves during pre-Civil War days. Green takes readers on a cruise from Elizabeth City, North Carolina, to Deep Creek, Virginia, highlighting the canal's engineering and its role in history.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p12-16, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7738
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beach vitex was introduced into the southeastern United States from Korea in the 1980s. Scientists believed the plant could help stabilize sand dunes. Beach vitex now grows as far north as Ocracoke Island and as far south as Florida and Alabama. Heavy concentrations are also found on Bogue Banks, Bald Head Island, and Oak Island. Experts in North Carolina are seeking to have the plant listed as a Federal Noxious Weed. North and South Carolina's two-state task force has worked to stop the plant's spread.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p26-29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7736
Author(s):
Abstract:
The blue crab is North Carolina's most valuable commercial fishery. The state was the top blue crab producing one between 1994 and 1999. In 2002, the state still accounted for 21 percent of the country's total harvest. A Blue Crab Research Program by North Carolina Sea Grant specialist Sara Mirabilio provides insight into crab harvests, management, and research. Green explains the project and takes the reader on a crabbing trip in the Currituck Sound.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p17-21, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7737
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the 1980s and 1990s, southern flounder became a major fishery in the state. This occurred because restrictions on the summer flounder fishery increased the demand for other flounder. The southern flounder became so popular commercially that the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries now considers this flounder overfished. The division approved a statewide management plan in 2005 that imposes new guidelines to protect the fishery and help it recover. Seiling discusses three North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant research teams that are studying the southern flounder to assist in better management and to provide regional data about the fish.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p22-25, il Periodical Website