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5 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue , Holiday 2004
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Record #:
6935
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Abstract:
Muzel Bryant was born on Ocracoke on March 12, 1904. She traces her lineage on the island back to the Civil War. At the war's close in 1865, all former slaves left the island. Her grandparents were the only two African Americans to move from the mainland to Ocracoke. Bryant has lived off the island only once when she worked during her teenage years in Philadelphia. Today, at the age of 100, she is an important link to Outer Banks history.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2004, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
6934
Author(s):
Abstract:
The lionfish has venomous spines. It eats everything, produces eggs that free float, and has few known predators. Spotted off the North Carolina Coast in August 2000, it is the first marine invasive fish to have established itself in Atlantic waters. Loughner discusses this threat to the state's coastal ecosystems and the dangers posed to divers and fishermen.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2004, p16-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6938
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Abstract:
In 2000, Elizabeth City State University began its Marine Environmental Science program. Enrollment for the program was four students. In 2004, nineteen students were in the program. Green discusses the program and areas of student participation, including salt marsh restoration and surveys of coastal vegetation.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2004, p27-29, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6937
Author(s):
Abstract:
Phragmites australis, or common reed, is a tall innocent-looking marsh plant with cane-like stems, blue-green leaves, and purplish plumes on top. However, the plant's strong anchoring roots can spread out to reproduce exponentially. The common reed's dense growth can crowd out native vegetation and wildlife habitats. Smith discusses what is being done to eliminate this invasive plant.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2004, p24-26, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6936
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has a long history of shrimping. Commercial shrimping began in the early days of the 20th-century and centered around the Southport area. Three species of shrimp are caught in the state's coastal waters -- the brown, pink, and white. Green discusses the history of shrimping from Native American times to the present; boats and equipment used; and legal and environmental issues.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2004, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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