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252 results for "North Carolina Preservation"
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Record #:
34526
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since North Carolina expanded its historic rehabilitation tax credit program in 1998, over 1,300 projects have been completed. This has led to a rise in the economy, employment, and revenue for the state. It also allows homeowners a tax credit for their preservation efforts, and has been proven to be a highly effective tool for economic development for all parties involved.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 134 Issue , Fall 2008, p3-4, f
Record #:
34527
Abstract:
The City of Raleigh Planning Department conducted a survey on management practices for protecting neighborhood character. The survey concluded that city-wide rezoning, neighborhood conservation and local historic districts, and preservation easements all allow for the character of structures and neighborhoods to remain intact.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 134 Issue , Fall 2008, p5-7, il
Record #:
34528
Author(s):
Abstract:
PNC has acquired four of North Carolina’s most important historic homes with the intent to restore them to their former state. Restoration projects are being undertaken at the Bellamy Mansion, Coolmore Plantation, Banker’s House, and El Nido; Bellamy Mansion is a museum open to the public, but under PNC’s care, the other three will likely not be open to the public.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 134 Issue , Fall 2008, p9-10, il
Record #:
8870
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preservation North Carolina started its Endangered Properties Program in 1977. Then the first criteria for preservation was that the property had to be endangered. In 2007, North Carolina is experiencing explosive growth and the definition of what constitutes an endangered property has changed. Myrick discusses this new endangered definition, such as historic buildings sited on highly developable land; historic buildings located on agricultural land; and historic buildings that are candidates for salvage and reuse of their contents.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 131, Spring 2007, p3-6, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
8864
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Gertrude S. Carraway Award of Merit recognizes organizations and individuals demonstrating strong commitment to promotion of historical preservation. Among the 2006 winners are Fayetteville and the Fayetteville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau for acquiring the condemned 1890 Cape Fear and Yadkin Valley Railway Depot and rehabilitating it into a transportation museum and Brooks Graham's restoration of her mother's antebellum farmhouse, the Farrish-Lambeth House in Sanford.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 131, Spring 2007, p7-8, il
Record #:
8865
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 2006 Ruth Coltrane Cannon Award, North Carolina's most prestigious preservation award, was presented Hamilton C. Horton, Jr. of Winston-Salem. Horton received the award for more than thirty years of service to historic preservation both as a private citizen and as a five-term senator in the North Carolina General Assembly.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 131, Spring 2007, p11, il
Record #:
8866
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preservation North Carolina presented its 2006 historic preservation awards to the following recipients: Old Salem, Inc. (Minnette C. Duffy Landscape Preservation Award); Hickory Landmarks Society (Stedman Incentive Grant); Reid Thomas (Robert E, Stipe Professional Award); and Greg Hatem, Empire Properties, Raleigh (L. Vincent Lowe, Jr., Business Award).
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 131, Spring 2007, p9-10, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
34536
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the decline of the house museums that were once popular around the country, PNC must decide the fates of two bequeathed houses, El Nido and the Banker’s House. Unable to sell the properties due to the wishes of the deceased, PNC has decided to make the Banker’s House their southwest regional office, and to develop a resident curatorship for El Nido. These examples have led to PNC creating conditions of acceptance for large gifts.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 132 Issue , Fall 2007, p3-6, il, por
Record #:
34537
Abstract:
An argument is made that older, historic windows are more energy efficient than replacing them with new ones that tout being environmentally friendly. Before replacing historic windows, one should look at factors such as energy already expended to create and install the window, reusability or recyclability of the windows, and quality of the new windows over the historic ones. By repairing historic windows, homeowners can save money and improve energy efficiency while still maintaining the historic character and value.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 132 Issue , Fall 2007, p8-9, il
Record #:
7799
Author(s):
Abstract:
Henry Bonitz was born in Goldsboro and moved with his family to Wilmington around 1886. In 1893, he graduated from North Carolina State University in the first graduating class with a bachelor degree in Engineering. He owned his own architectural firm in Wilmington in 1894. Bonitz was a prolific architect, and his office planned 132 known works in Wilmington, plus buildings in 37 other North Carolina counties before his death at age 49. Seapker is seeking the location of buildings Bonitz might have designed in North Carolina.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 129, Spring 2006, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
7800
Abstract:
Innovative projects are bringing historic mill buildings back to life all across North Carolina. No longer eyesores, renovated mills have become desirable features in the economic and social fabric of their communities. Renovated buildings become sites for restaurants, stores, and condominiums. Among topics discussed are the costs of renovation, quality of original construction, impact on the neighborhood, and local participation.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 129, Spring 2006, p10-11, il
Record #:
7797
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Gertrude S. Carraway Award of Merit recognizes organizations and individuals demonstrating strong commitment to promotion of historical preservation. Among the 2005 winners were the town of Woodville for preservation of the 1847 St. Francis Methodist Church and Hank and Diane Parfitt for their rehabilitation of Fayetteville's 19th century Rat Building.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 129, Spring 2006, p16-17, il
Record #:
7798
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preservation North Carolina presented its 2005 preservation awards to the following recipients: Lucy Penegar (Ruth Coltrane Cannon Award); Angelo Franceschina (Robert E. Stipe Professional Award); Capitol Broadcasting Co. (L. Vincent Lowe, Jr. Business Award); The Friends of Woodlawn, Inc. (Stedman Incentive Grant); and Larry Horne and Ron Phillips (Minnette C. Duffy Landscape Preservation award).
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 129, Spring 2006, p14-15, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
8241
Author(s):
Abstract:
In June 2006, the North Carolina General Assembly created a new tax incentive for the adaptive use of vacant historic agricultural, manufacturing, and utility buildings. The law provides enhanced tax credits for the historic rehabilitation of buildings that have been substantially vacant for at least two years. The rehabilitation costs must exceed $3 million.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 130, Fall 2006, p3, il
Record #:
8242
Author(s):
Abstract:
A preservation easement is a legal agreement between a property owner and a preservation organization in which the property owner agrees to preserve the historic features of the property. The preservation organization is granted the right to enforce the covenants of the easement and to monitor the property. Pearson discusses how an easement works; what properties are eligible for easements; and tax advantages of an easement.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 130, Fall 2006, p4-7, il