NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


1246 results for "North Carolina Historical Review"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 84
Next
Record #:
40708
Abstract:
Included in a discussion of this stadium’s early history is the motives of the stadium’s founder, largely based on rivalry. William Rand Kenan Jr. was driven to compete with other higher education institutions in the North and North Carolina, as well as the efforts of his philanthropic rival, John Motley Morehead III.
Record #:
41242
Abstract:
A freedom offered to slaves perhaps lesser known than the Emancipation Proclamation is religious expression. Contraband camps, established by Union troops for former slaves, provided a way for former slaves to openly express Christian faith. Along with African American religious leaders such as James Walker Hood, they helped establish the African Methodist Episcopal Zion church. As for churches such as AMEZ, they also provided a sanctuary from racism and sowing ground for the seeds of political representation.
Record #:
41241
Author(s):
Abstract:
The First Colony Foundation’s efforts have yielded the recognition of its lesser known figures. Stafford’s contributions to European exploration included helping to lead the 1585 expedition and establish the Roanoke colony. Related to his identity is the author’s examination of several Stafford families possibly including him. Speculations of Stafford’s importance in permanent European settlements, had his life not been cut short, include involvement in Jamestown.
Record #:
40703
Author(s):
Abstract:
Credited with coining the term genocide, Lemkin also receives credit for participating in the adoption of international human rights law. Nazi atrocities upon Jews inspired Lemkin's efforts, which continued during his tenure as a Duke University political science lecturer and law student.
Record #:
40704
Author(s):
Abstract:
As a representative of Presbyterian Church USA, Robert Wharton encouraged the coalition of the laborer masses to work together for the betterment of Cuba. During his three decades’ missionary work, he inspired initiatives such as the construction of schools, colleges, and community centers, as well as the improvement of the nation’s infrastructure.
Record #:
41281
Author(s):
Abstract:
This history of North Carolina’s Supreme Court spans over two centuries. Whichard examined its legislature that became more progressive to the benefit of minorities and children. He revealed how over time this assembly of judges became more representative of North Carolina’s population. The author also noted judges who played a formidable role in its development such as John Louis Taylor, Walter Clark, and Sam Ervin IV.
Record #:
41282
Author(s):
Abstract:
Davis illustrates how North Carolina’s Supreme Court from the antebellum period to the Great Depression was heavily influenced by two factors. One is English law, the other three of the state’s law schools. The extent of this influence is examined in how individuals like William Blackstone contributed to the state legislative branch's development. It is also examined in how these law schools’ curricula impacted law reform.
Record #:
41283
Abstract:
A signet ring found in the Outer Banks in 1998 was believed to be made from gold and belong to people part of the Lost Colony. Reexamination two decades later concluded that the ring not made from this metal, nor was it associated with the Kendall family. Enhancing understanding of the ring’s believed place in early North Carolina history was a review of long believed information about the Lost Colony.